Top 5: 70’s Electronic Music

Image result for 1. Tangerine Dream: Encore (1977)
1. Tangerine Dream: Encore (1977)

Really impossible to pick out an album of The Dream from the 70’s as the best. When the choice falls on Encore (recorded live on the US tour in March and April ’77), it is primarily because this album shows the different sides of the band in an excellent way. Here find s the hottest sequencer rhythms ever attached to the plate grooves, some of the best Froese made at el. guitar, romantic / melodious parties (including Monolight theme ), and it’s all crowned with Desert Dream (page 4 on the original double-LP) – a 17 min. masterpieces where the group is at its most introverted and creates sounds and moods of supernatural beauty. Important also historically, since this was the last album with the classic crew Froese / Franke / Baumann. Peter B. left TD after this tour.

 

2: Klaus Schulze: Mirage (1977)

Typically Schulze, in the sense that the album consists of two approx. 30 minutes long track of pure cosmic magic. The album has the subtitle “Eine elektronische Winterlandschaft”, creating a completely unique atmosphere of cold and foreignity. The perfect soundtrack for the winters we have had here in Norway in recent years.

 

3: Ashra: New Age of Earth (1977)

Solo album by guitarist Manuel Göttsching (formerly Ash Ra Temple), and one of the most successful examples where synther is mixed with electricity. guitar. The titles say most about the mood the music creates: Sunrain , Ocean of Tend erness , Deep Distance and Nightdust.

 

4: Kraftwerk: Autobahn (1974)

After three more experimental albums (published 1971-73), Kraftwerk with Autobahn finds its “style”, as they themselves referred to as robot pop. With this album they lay the foundation for later genres such as synth pop, hip-hop and techno, and the list of artists who have received inspiration from Schneider, Hütter & co. is long.

 

5: Vangelis: Beauborg (1978)

For those who only know Vangelis as a film composer or through the collaboration with Jon Anderson, this may be a bit of a shock. This is advanced experimental electronic music without the hint of melody and could as well be placed under the heading of contemporary music.