Classical music – I Am War Music http://iamwarmusic.com/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 16:43:40 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://iamwarmusic.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/profile.png Classical music – I Am War Music http://iamwarmusic.com/ 32 32 Why do musicians memorize music? And should they…? https://iamwarmusic.com/why-do-musicians-memorize-music-and-should-they/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 14:41:49 +0000 https://iamwarmusic.com/why-do-musicians-memorize-music-and-should-they/ Why do professional classical musicians do it? Why do they memorize entire pieces, from violin partitas to piano concertos, from sonatas to symphonies? All those thousands of notes, each of them entering the brains and bodies of soloists, singers, orchestral musicians and conductors, so that they can play any bar at will. a Bach fugue […]]]>

Why do professional classical musicians do it? Why do they memorize entire pieces, from violin partitas to piano concertos, from sonatas to symphonies? All those thousands of notes, each of them entering the brains and bodies of soloists, singers, orchestral musicians and conductors, so that they can play any bar at will. a Bach fugue or a Tchaikovsky concerto, without hesitation, deviation or repetition.

One reason is that we viewers love the thrill of these feats of memory. Think of any concerto performance you might have seen: without a score in front of the soloist, it is as if the music emerged unmediated from their subconscious. Music is a charm that delights before our eyes and ears; it no longer belongs Beethoven Where Rachmaninoff – it’s Anne-Sophie Mutter’s, it’s Martha Argerich’s.

However, this fetishism of memory has not always been part of musical culture. It started in earnest with Francois Liszt, in his solo concerts of the first decades of the 19th century. Liszt’s piano recitals were sensuous rituals of super-virtuosity, in which his audiences were mesmerized by his ability to produce entire repertoires of music on the spot.

The pianist Stephen Hough wrote of this return to memory, wonderful for Liszt but anathema to others: “Chopin would not have approved”. In reality, Chopin ‘admonished a pupil once for playing a memoir piece, accusing him of arrogance’. And why? Because “back when every pianist was also a composer, playing without a score usually meant you were improvising. Playing a Chopin ballad from memory might have seemed like you were trying to pass off this masterpiece as your own.

It is the pride of playing from memory: claiming as a performer that you are inventing on a whim is an affront to composers who have struggled on their pieces.

And there is another problem with memory. The condition for a culture that requires soloists to memorize their parts is that there must be a fixed historical repertoire written by other people for them to learn. And since the majority of them are now deceased, there is no real danger that anyone will confuse the performer with the composer. Our insistence on memory comes at the cost of new pieces entering the repertoire, being composed so quickly that there is no time to memorize them.

So the next time you see a soloist playing with the score, it’s not that he hasn’t learned the piece: he is restoring musical culture to a state of potential creation, not a mausoleum of memory in which each note is fixed in advance. While memory can be liberating for some musicians, we as audiences shouldn’t demand it of all performers. When memory becomes an ideology, we may lose more than we gain.

Illustration by Maria Corte Maidagan

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Penarth Chamber Music Festival review – bold and invigorating performances | Classical music https://iamwarmusic.com/penarth-chamber-music-festival-review-bold-and-invigorating-performances-classical-music/ Sun, 26 Jun 2022 18:26:00 +0000 https://iamwarmusic.com/penarth-chamber-music-festival-review-bold-and-invigorating-performances-classical-music/ BThe past lineup of co-director cellist Alice Neary and violinist David Adams makes their four-day summer festival a most enticing event and it’s clearly also a factor that attracts fellow musicians from all over to join them. Chamber music is still considered the music of friends, and Penarth audiences feel included. Winning new friends for […]]]>

BThe past lineup of co-director cellist Alice Neary and violinist David Adams makes their four-day summer festival a most enticing event and it’s clearly also a factor that attracts fellow musicians from all over to join them. Chamber music is still considered the music of friends, and Penarth audiences feel included.

Winning new friends for less familiar works is also part of the strategy and, in this context, the Chamber Symphony No. 1 Op. 9 by Schönberg was convincingly defended. should be better understood has given rise to various adjustments. He encouraged his pupil Anton Webern to adopt the same line-up as his Pierrot Lunaire so that both could be performed in Barcelona in 1925. Schönberg then conducted it, a precedent often followed, but it was a testament to the caliber and mutual understanding of these musicians – Adams and Neary with pianist Simon Crawford-Phillips, flautist Matthew Featherstone and clarinetist Robert Plane – that they did not need it. In a thrusting interpretation of great clarity, only the central adagio section offered moments of expressive languor before the fierce general momentum was reinforced. In the relative privacy of the Penarth Pier Pavilion, it was an invigorating experience.

An arrangement by Australian composer James Ledger of Strauss’ Four Last Songs formed the centerpiece of a concert at All Saints Church. Soprano Rebecca Evans was the radiant yet thoughtful soloist. Ledger’s choice of 13 instruments – string septet, wind quintet and piano – is relatively faithful to the original: the great solos for horn and violin remain and in these phrasings by Adams and George Strivens they are carried beautifully. The gain in transparency allows the voice to easily overlap the texture and allows Crawford-Phillips, now conductor, to bring out the profusion of counter-melodies sometimes submerged in the lushness of the orchestral version. More unexpected was Ledger’s requirement that in the final song, Im Abendrot, the pianist uses a percussion mallet to strike the strings low inside the instrument, an extra vibration to prick the ear.

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Best Summer Books of 2022: Classical Music https://iamwarmusic.com/best-summer-books-of-2022-classical-music/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 10:00:15 +0000 https://iamwarmusic.com/best-summer-books-of-2022-classical-music/ The Silence of the North: Journeys into Nordic music and cultureby Andrew Mellor, Yale University Press £18.99/$30 The Nordic lands have become a musical powerhouse, from Grieg and Sibelius to Björk and Eurovision winners. Over a decade or more, a passion for all things Norse has led Mellor to explore Norse culture, its folklore and […]]]>

The Silence of the North: Journeys into Nordic music and culture
by Andrew Mellor, Yale University Press £18.99/$30

The Nordic lands have become a musical powerhouse, from Grieg and Sibelius to Björk and Eurovision winners. Over a decade or more, a passion for all things Norse has led Mellor to explore Norse culture, its folklore and landscapes, the Black Norse mindset, and most importantly, its musical richness.

The war on music: Reclaiming the 20th century
by John Mauceri, Yale University Press £22.00 / $28

Two world wars changed the course of music in the 20th century. Tracing the malignant influence of politics, from Hitler to Stalin, Mauceri shows how music became part of the weaponry of identity. Refugee composers have lost their place in the mainstream and Mauceri argues for a reassessment of those who are forgotten and rejected.

Conversations
by Steve Reich Hannover Square Press £22.11 / $27.99

Imagine having the opportunity to talk one-on-one with Reich about his music. Here are 19 conversations, simply transcribed as we go along, with other musicians who had a close connection with Reich. They include Jonny Greenwood, Nico Muhly, Stephen Sondheim and Julia Wolfe.

Summer books 2022

All this week, FT writers and critics are sharing their favourites. Some highlights are:

Monday: Economics by Martin Wolf
Tuesday: Environment by Pilita Clark
Wednesday: Fiction by Laura Battle
Thursday: Story by Tony Barber
Friday: Politics by Gideon Rachman
Saturday: Critics’ Choice

Join our online book group on Facebook at FT Books Coffee

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World-class classical music is coming to Chautauqua from Boulder this summer https://iamwarmusic.com/world-class-classical-music-is-coming-to-chautauqua-from-boulder-this-summer/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 11:25:53 +0000 https://iamwarmusic.com/world-class-classical-music-is-coming-to-chautauqua-from-boulder-this-summer/ The Colorado Music Festival has been held for 46 years in the shadow of the Boulder Flatirons. This year, the festivities span six weeks at the Chautauqua Auditorium, from Thursday, June 30 through Sunday, August 7, showcasing some of today’s finest classical spirits. Participating musicians represent a total of 44 orchestras from 23 states, four […]]]>

The Colorado Music Festival has been held for 46 years in the shadow of the Boulder Flatirons. This year, the festivities span six weeks at the Chautauqua Auditorium, from Thursday, June 30 through Sunday, August 7, showcasing some of today’s finest classical spirits. Participating musicians represent a total of 44 orchestras from 23 states, four provinces and three countries, offering a repertoire that ranges from classic interpretations of contemporary music, such as the work of leftist beatsmith Flying Lotus, to Beethoven’s greatest compositions.

Started in 1976 at the First Presbyterian Church in Boulder, the Colorado Music Festival was founded by University of Colorado Boulder director Giora Bernstein as a showcase for the Colorado Chamber Orchestra. Within two years, the festival moved to the then newly restored Chautauqua Auditorium, where it won the first of five ASCAP Adventurous Programming Awards.

This year’s program is selected by the festival’s musical director, Peter Oundjian. With experience as a performer and conductor for some of the world’s top institutions, Oundjian brings acclaimed experience to the festival’s legacy. While attending the Royal College of Music in London in 1975, he received the Tagore Gold Medal from Queen Elizabeth and, aged just 25, he was appointed Assistant Professor of Violin at Yale University. He became concertmaster of the Tokyo String Quartet in 1981, a position he held for fourteen years, until focal left-hand dystonia forced him to put his instrumental career aside.

The injury would transform the trajectory of Oundjian’s orbit. Just one month after leaving the Tokyo Quartet, André Previn, the famous German pianist, invited Oundjian to conduct three concerts on the occasion of the fiftieth anniversary of the Caramoor International Music Festival, a prestigious event of which he would later become artistic director. Since then, Oundjian has held positions with institutions such as the Toronto Symphony Orchestra, Detroit Symphony Orchestra, Royal Scottish National Orchestra and Amsterdam Sinfonietta. In 2022, he was named Principal Conductor of the Colorado Symphony Orchestra.

Oundjian joined the Colorado Music Festival in 2018 as a consultant. “I couldn’t believe I didn’t know that!” he says today. “I received a call a little over five years ago, which seems very recent, from an old friend named Alberto Gutierrez, the [festival’s] artistic administrator, asking if I would be a consultant for the summer while they were looking for a musical director. That search didn’t last long, as a year later he accepted that title and became responsible for all programming, including this year’s Artist and Composer in Residence, Pulitzer Prize winner and five-time award winner. a Grammy, John Adams.

“John is an incredibly brilliant composer, and his works are probably featured more often than any contemporary composer today,” says Oundjian. “Initially, when he was a young composer, he experimented a lot with minimalism, a bit like Steve Reich and Philip Glass, but he quickly moved away from what we could call pure minimalism towards a language that is really the his. own.” The famous author will perform six of his plays throughout the festival and will be on the podium for two of them.

The Grammy Award-winning band Takács Quartet, a band Oundjian calls one of the greatest of all time, will be the festival’s artist-in-residence. The now Boulder-based quartet began 47 years ago in Budapest and consists of a rotating cast of members, with cellist and original member András Fejér being the only constant. The quartet began to attract international attention in 1977, when it won first prize and the Critics’ Prize at the International String Quartet Competition in Évian-les-Bains, France. By 1983 he had moved to the United States and soon after was offered a residency at the University of Colorado at Boulder, a position the quartet has held ever since. During his tenure, the Takacs Quartet has won three Gramophone Awards – one of classical music’s most coveted accolades – in addition to the Grammy.

The quartet will give three performances during the festival. He will open the festival with Adams’s absolute joke June 30, which he will repeat the following night. The quartet will then play three pieces on July 5: Joseph Haydn’s String Quartet in F major, Op. 77, No. 2“Fantasiestücke for String Quartet, Op.5” by Samuel Coleridge-Taylor and Antonin Dvorak String Quartet No. 13 in G major, Op. 106.

Oundjian notes that it takes a certain finesse to create classic programming that appeals to the general public: “Whether you’re programming for an orchestra for an entire season or for a festival, there are very few people who are going to come to all the concerts. And these people will come to all the shows, regardless of the programs, because they love the festival; they are like a family. In order to attract a variety of listeners, “you have to look for really interesting and wide-ranging ideas,” he says. “You have to strike a great balance between getting an audience to listen to something they’ve never heard and something familiar.”

The festival’s opening night performance is a good example of the fusion of familiarity with originality, says Oundjian. As the night is announced as ‘Takács Quartet Plays John Adams’ absolute joke“, it includes three different compositions by three composers, with absolute joke being the highlight. The first is “Fate Now Conquers”, by relatively young American composer Carlos Simon, which debuted in September 2020. Although the work is contemporary, it was commissioned in response to Beethoven’s Fourth, Seventh and Eighth Symphonies, giving it a sense of familiarity for more discerning classical music fans. Beethoven’s influence is then infused with modern music styles such as jazz, gospel and neo-romanticism – a lush display of the juxtaposition sought by Oundjian in his curations.

The other two performances of the evening are also striking illustrations of the fusion of old and new, with absolute joke being a vaguely minimalist interpretation of the grandiose symphonies of Beethoven and Dvorak New World Symphony being the catalyst for many familiar modern compositions, including those made for star wars, Jaws and The Lord of the Rings.

Each year, the festival organizes a series of premieres. One of them, “Dark Patterns”, by Brooklyn-based composer Timo Andres, was specially commissioned for the festival. Other commissions include “Flying on the Scaly Backs of Our Mountains”, by Wang Jie, and “Herald, Holler and Hallelujah!”, by jazz great Wynton Marsalis.

The Colorado Music Festival is also inviting eight college-age virtuosos to receive coaching and performance opportunities through a scholarship program. The program provides access to the festival’s top guest artist mentors, in addition to weekly performances with the festival orchestra. The scholarship program was developed with the intention of creating diversity within classical music and includes students from all cultural backgrounds. This year’s scholarship recipients include four members of Miami’s New World Symphony: Chava Appiah, James Zabawa-Martinez, Jacquelyn O’Brien and Ka-Yeon Lee. They will be joined by Kate Arndt of Yale, award-winning Vera Quartet founder Justin Goldsmith, Byungchan Lee of the Vancouver Symphony and Grace Takeda of Juilliard. All were chosen through an invitation-only process, selected by educators from North America’s top music conservatories.

The festival’s initial success came from its ability to spot emerging talent and recruit them for its orchestra – a tradition that continues with the festival’s association with the Center for Musical Arts. The mission of this Lafeyette-based non-profit organization is to provide music education for all ages, across the music spectrum. During the festival, Oundjian and the announced artists will teach classes and perform at the center, an experience which the conductor says is invaluable. “It’s actually really important that these young kids, who are just starting to play, can eventually be exposed to some of the greatest musicians in the world. Because it’s so empowering, isn’t it?” Oundjian asks rhetorically.” It can be a real source of inspiration.”

Colorado Music Festival, Thursday, June 30-August 7, Chautauqua Auditorium, 900 Baseline Road in Boulder. Tickets are available at coloradomusicfestival.org.

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Theodora: the show must go on | Opera reviews + classical music https://iamwarmusic.com/theodora-the-show-must-go-on-opera-reviews-classical-music/ Sat, 18 Jun 2022 07:01:20 +0000 https://iamwarmusic.com/theodora-the-show-must-go-on-opera-reviews-classical-music/ The theatre, on stage and off stage, marks the beginning of an enterprising festival. Fflur Wyn (Photo: Lorne Campbell / Guzelian) Those of us who were lucky enough to be present at Glyndebourne’s 1996 production of Handel Theodora can remember it primarily as our first ‘live’ experience of not only the wonderful music but also […]]]>

The theatre, on stage and off stage, marks the beginning of an enterprising festival.

Fflur Wyn (Photo: Lorne Campbell / Guzelian)

Those of us who were lucky enough to be present at Glyndebourne’s 1996 production of Handel Theodora can remember it primarily as our first ‘live’ experience of not only the wonderful music but also the singing of David Daniels and Lorraine Hunt Lieberson as Didymus and Irene respectively. One would imagine that a semi-staged version in the old St. Andrew’s Church 26 years later would necessarily be a disappointment – but it wasn’t. Although he took over from an indisposed Lawrence Zazzo on very short notice, William Towers was sensational in the difficult role of countertenor, and despite not having years of experience, Irene d’Helen Charlston was a moving portrait.

The Northern Aldborough Festival, set in the idyllic setting of one of North Yorkshire’s most pastoral villages, has ambitions beyond its size, and this opening production delivers. Directed by Joe Austin, very simply but with an undeniable sense of authenticity, there was not a single weak link in the entire performance. The specialized baroque group “Sounds Baroque” led by Julian Perkins, launched the action with confidence and never wavered in the authority of their playing, with a particularly refined work of the horns (Peter McNeill, Nivanthi Karunaratne) and the theorbo (Kristiina Watt). When an audience member fell ill, necessitating a cut in the second half, the conductor’s handling of the sudden changes and the actors’ reaction to the situation was amazing to watch. As for the singers, the way they coped with these changes was a remarkable example of teamwork.

That such a distinguished cast could be assembled for such a small-scale festival is a tribute to the organization, and it was a shame there weren’t dead tree press critics present to make experience a song of such intensity and power. Henry Waddington is well known for his many operatic roles, his Glyndebourne Saul being particularly memorable, and here he was a convincing populist Valens, his genuine Handel bass doing light work of the complex music. Tenor Benjamin Hulett’s bugle tone is ideal for the conflicted role of Septimius, and his scenes with Didymus were particularly well done. Edwin Lambert’s Messenger fell victim to truncation, but its brief lines in Act I were enough to show promise.

“…there was not a single weak link in the whole performance”

‘The raptur’d soul defies the sword’ is one of Handel’s finest countertenor arias, and William Towers sang it with virtuosic fluidity and richness of tone. “Kind Heav’n, If Virtue Be Your Care” was equally impressive, and his scenes with Theodora were heartbreaking. Fflur Wyn shares a remarkable record of Handelian experience with his colleagues, and his Theodora was strongly characterized while beautifully sung. Their final farewell melted the view.

Irene is a role strongly associated with the much-missed Lorraine Hunt Lieberson, but Helen Charlston rose to the challenge and made it her own. Her tone is a little harsher than her predecessor, but she made effective use of it to portray a zealous companion. ‘As a rosy step’ and ‘Lord, yours every night and every day’ kept the audience spellbound.

The York University Singers are a young and enthusiastic group whose small numbers belie their professional sound. the closing chorales of each half were beautifully sung and their voices, while very impressive individually, blended together to produce an ideal harmony.

This performance builds on the strengths of the 2019 edition of the Festival Mixesand is the precursor to the staging planned for 2024 Theodora. It’s perhaps not a stretch to hope that a few more critics will make the long trip north for what is sure to be a momentous occasion.

• Further details of the Northern Aldborough Festival can be found here.

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Who is Sally Beamish | Classical music https://iamwarmusic.com/who-is-sally-beamish-classical-music/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 13:18:45 +0000 https://iamwarmusic.com/who-is-sally-beamish-classical-music/ Who is Sally Beamish? Sally Beamish is a composer and former violist from Stirlingshire, Scotland, who writes highly evocative music, often influenced by her love of Scotland, its landscape and its culture. She has written for opera, concert hall, theatre, film and television, but, like composers benjamin britten and Peter Maxwell Davieswith whom she has […]]]>

Who is Sally Beamish?

Sally Beamish is a composer and former violist from Stirlingshire, Scotland, who writes highly evocative music, often influenced by her love of Scotland, its landscape and its culture. She has written for opera, concert hall, theatre, film and television, but, like composers benjamin britten and Peter Maxwell Davieswith whom she has often collaborated, she is also passionate about composing for children and her local community.

How old is Sally Beamish?

Sally Beamish was born on August 26, 1956.

How would you describe by Sally Beamish work?

Tonal, lyrical, thoughtful and eclectic in its blend of influences, weaving together elements of Scottish folk music, alongside Jazz and the chirping of birds.

Does she come from a musical background?

Yes, her father was an amateur singer and her mother was a professional violinist – a freelancer from the Academy of St Martin-in-the-Fields – who taught Beamish to read and write music before she can read and write letters. Her brother was also a talented singer and all four gave many concerts as a family.

When Sally Beamish decide to be a composer?

Not before their thirties. After training at the Royal Northern College of Music in Manchester, Beamish initially worked for several years as a freelance violist, performing with groups including the London Sinfonietta. Her desire to compose remained on the back burner until her prized 18th century Gabrielli viola was stolen from her home. With the optimism that characterizes her, she interprets this loss as an opportunity for change and soon after devotes herself to composition.

What are his most famous plays?

It’s hard to choose. But for a novice in his work, it is worth taking a look at his Accordion Concerto; The sailor, his second viola concerto based on a ninth-century Anglo-Saxon poem; and Seavaigershis chamber concerto for harp and violin.

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Does she still play the viola?

Yes. His third child – a daughter – got him a viola, which brought Beamish back to the instrument after a 20-year hiatus. The composer also paints, narrates and writes: in 2006, she won The Scottish and the Orange Short Story Award for his drama, houseworkabout a woman whose life is turned upside down when her husband leaves.

When can I hear his music?

At BBC Promson Thursday July 21, when the BBC National Orchestra of Wales, under the direction of Ariane Matiakh, performs the world premiere of the new work by Sally Beamish: Hive.
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The surprising role played by classical music in the invention of the Post-it Note https://iamwarmusic.com/the-surprising-role-played-by-classical-music-in-the-invention-of-the-post-it-note/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 11:29:13 +0000 https://iamwarmusic.com/the-surprising-role-played-by-classical-music-in-the-invention-of-the-post-it-note/ 16 June 2022, 12:29 Arthur Fry, inventor of the Post-it Note, found inspiration in the pages of his hymn. Image: Getty How a failed invention and choir hymnal led to one of the most iconic desk staples of the 20th century. It’s 1968, and in a lab in the midwestern state of Minnesota, USA, Dr. […]]]>

16 June 2022, 12:29

Arthur Fry, inventor of the Post-it Note, found inspiration in the pages of his hymn.

Image: Getty


How a failed invention and choir hymnal led to one of the most iconic desk staples of the 20th century.

It’s 1968, and in a lab in the midwestern state of Minnesota, USA, Dr. Spencer Silver is hard at work trying to develop an extra-strength adhesive for 3M, then called the Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing Company.

Instead of the super sticky substance he had hoped to create, Silver ended up with a “low tack” adhesive, albeit a reusable adhesive that could be stuck and peeled off when pressure was applied.

Anxious not to waste his time and effort, Dr. Silver looked everywhere for a use for what he called his “no problem solution.”

For five years, he presented his invention at various seminars and summits, but ultimately failed to realize his idea.

Read more: 15 of the Greatest Classical Choral Works Ever Written

The humble Post-it Note has its origins in church singing

The humble Post-it Note has its origins in church singing.

Photo: Aliyah


The Post-it Note – inspired by a man’s hymnbook needs

Little did Silver know, one of his 3M colleagues had attended one of those many seminars and wanted to learn more about the oddly behaving adhesive.

Arthur ‘Art’ Fry, who worked in new product development at 3M, was an avid singer and sang in his church choir in his spare time.

Fry often used small scraps of paper to mark important pages in his hymnal, but with nothing to hold them in place, they frequently fell off, causing Fry to lose his place and cost him valuable time.

One Sunday in 1973, while rehearsing the choir, he remembered Dr. Silver’s seminar. He wondered if he could somehow cover his bookmarks with the adhesive in a way that might help save his page more efficiently, without damaging his delicate, ultra-thin pages. collection of hymns.

Read more: Mystery of 19th century altar boy who hid a ‘remember me’ plea on a pew is solved

Returning to work the next day, he asked if he could use a sample of Dr. Silver’s adhesive to test his idea.

In the spirit of encouraging creative collaboration and inventiveness, 3M launched an “allowed contraband” initiative, which Fry used to further develop his design.

Using scrap paper borrowed from the lab next door – which turned out to be canary yellow – Fry experimented with different ways to apply the adhesive to the paper, eventually settling on a strip of glue along one edge of the paper: enough to allow it to stick, with no adhesion left on the part of the bookmark that extended from the page.

Silver and Fry then began leaving notes for each other, taped to various surfaces around the desk. It was then that they realized the full potential of their discovery.

Read more: The singer sings an ancient hymn in an empty Pantheon-style church, with impressive 6-second acoustics

The duo brought their genius invention to 3M management, but it took a bit of effort to get them on board. In 1977, the company began testing product sales in four US cities, marketing the sticky notes as “Press ‘n Peel” bookmarks.

The results are discouraging, but the following year, the marketing department proposes a new strategy: give the product directly to consumers, so that they can try it for free. 94% of those who tried the product said they would buy it again. The success of the Post-it Note was therefore guaranteed.

1980 – the year the Post-it Note hit the shelves

On April 6, 1980, Post-it Notes as we know them hit shelves, and a year later they were also launched in Canada and Europe. That same year, 3M named the Post-it Note its Outstanding New Product and awarded the development team the “Golden Step Award” in 1980 and 1981, a recognition given to 3M teams “who create major new products which are significantly profitable”. .

Even with such accolades to his name, Fry remained humble, saying “My greatest reward is seeing so many people using and enjoying my product.”

In 2010, Art Fry and Dr. Spencer Silver were inducted into the US National Inventors Hall of Fame, the highest recognition for two hitherto unsung heroes.

And now, nearly 50 years after its invention, the story behind the creation of the Post-it Note shows that inspiration can strike in the most unlikely places.

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Sapporo Classical Music Festival to be held in its entirety for the first time in 3 years https://iamwarmusic.com/sapporo-classical-music-festival-to-be-held-in-its-entirety-for-the-first-time-in-3-years/ Tue, 14 Jun 2022 22:30:00 +0000 https://iamwarmusic.com/sapporo-classical-music-festival-to-be-held-in-its-entirety-for-the-first-time-in-3-years/ SAPPORO–This northern town will host its annual Pacific Music Festival, an acclaimed summer for the first time in three years now that the worst of the COVID-19 pandemic appears to have subsided. The InterThe national classical music event founded in 1990 by renowned conductor Leonard Bernstein will be held from July 16 to August 2, […]]]>

SAPPORO–This northern town will host its annual Pacific Music Festival, an acclaimed summer for the first time in three years now that the worst of the COVID-19 pandemic appears to have subsided.

The InterThe national classical music event founded in 1990 by renowned conductor Leonard Bernstein will be held from July 16 to August 2, organizers have announced.

However, they warned that the event is subject to change, depending on the evolution of the public health crisis that has raged around the world for more than two years.

The festival accepts young classical musicians from around the world as members of the Academy, offering them the opportunity to perform with world-class musicians.

To date, the outdoor event, which was canceled in 2020 due to the pandemic, has trained over 3,600 musicians from 77 countries and regions.

In 2021, foreign musicians joined the online festival while Japan-based artists performed at concerts. But the event itself was canceled before the final day after a member of staff was found to be infected with the novel coronavirus.

This year, a total of 25 concerts will be offered ranging from chamber music to orchestral works in Sapporo, Tomakomai, Tokyo and elsewhere.

With Rainer Kuchl, Austrian violinist and former concertmaster of the Wiener Philharmoniker, and other musicians serving as instructors, the PMF Orchestra will comprise 52 Academy members.

Ken-David Masur, son of world-renowned conductor Kurt Masur, will lead the opening concert scheduled for Sapporo Concert Hall Kitara on July 16 to perform Mendelssohns Symphony No. 5, alias Reformation, and other parts.

The final concerts to be held on July 30, 31 and August 2 in Sapporo and Tokyo will feature Israel Philharmonic Orchestra Music Director Lahav Shani as conductor to introduce Brahms Symphony No. 2.

Popular pianist Makoto Ozone will also join to offer a solo performance.

For more information, visit the official website at (https://www.pmf.or.jp/en/).

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Van Cliburn International Piano Competition Names Six Finalists https://iamwarmusic.com/van-cliburn-international-piano-competition-names-six-finalists/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 11:21:00 +0000 https://iamwarmusic.com/van-cliburn-international-piano-competition-names-six-finalists/ The 16th Van Cliburn International Piano Competition, which runs June 2-18 in Fort Worth, Texas, has named the six finalists who will compete for its top prize of $100,000. Hailing from Ukraine, Russia, Belarus, South Korea and the United States, the six contestants were reduced by 30 pianists chosen to compete in the competition’s live […]]]>

The 16th Van Cliburn International Piano Competition, which runs June 2-18 in Fort Worth, Texas, has named the six finalists who will compete for its top prize of $100,000.

Hailing from Ukraine, Russia, Belarus, South Korea and the United States, the six contestants were reduced by 30 pianists chosen to compete in the competition’s live rounds via a semi-final which included a 60-minute recital and a piano concerto by Mozart.

The six finalists are:

Dmytro ChoniUkraine, 28 years oldAnna GeniusheneRussia, 31Uladzislau KhandohiBelarus, 20Yuchan LimSouth Korea, 18 years oldIlya ChmouklerRussia, 27Clayton StephensonUnited States, 23

During the final phase, each pianist will perform two piano concertos with the Fort Worth Symphony Orchestra conducted by Marin Alsop, who is also president of the jury this year. Winners will be announced at an awards ceremony on Saturday, June 18.

Earlier this year, the quadrennial competition announced that it would welcome participants from Russia, despite the country’s military action in Ukraine.

In a statement, Jacques Marquis, President and CEO of the competition, said: “The Cliburn must and will remain true to its mission as a cultural institution supporting artists, and we are dedicated to the power of this art form. to transcend borders. We make no distinction between non-political artists based on nationality, gender or ethnicity. We strongly support the music community worldwide in its commitment to these ideals. The Heart of the People de Cliburn stands with the valiant Ukrainians as they bravely defend their homeland against the Russian regime.What is happening goes against everything humanity should stand for.

Over the past few months, two major piano competitions – the Honens International Piano Competition in Canada and the Dublin International Piano Competition – announced that they would not be open to Russian pianists this year. The Honens, however, subsequently re-entered its Russian competitors following protests from the global music community and a petition of great musicians against the “general boycott” of Russian artists.

For the 2022 Van Cliburn International Piano Competition, the total prize money amount has been increased to $265,000, with $100,000 for gold, $50,000 for silver and $25,000 for bronze (The 2017 prizes were $50,000, $25,000, and $15,000, respectively.)

Sitting on the jury are conductor Marine Alsop, pianists Jean Efflam-Bavouzet, Alessio BaxRico Gulda, Andreas Haefliger, Wu Han, Stephen HoughAnne-Marie McDermott, Orli Shaham and Lilya Zilberstein.

Viewers around the world can watch the entire contest live and on demand at Cliburn.org, cliburn.medici.tvand youtube.com/thecliburn.

Photo: Ukrainian pianist Dmytro Choni during the Van Cliburn 2022 semi-final © Ralph Lauer

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