Classical music – I Am War Music http://iamwarmusic.com/ Fri, 25 Nov 2022 08:45:42 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://iamwarmusic.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/profile.png Classical music – I Am War Music http://iamwarmusic.com/ 32 32 Saunders: Skin; To cancel; Breathless review – important music, superbly delivered | Classical music https://iamwarmusic.com/saunders-skin-to-cancel-breathless-review-important-music-superbly-delivered-classical-music/ Thu, 24 Nov 2022 18:39:00 +0000 https://iamwarmusic.com/saunders-skin-to-cancel-breathless-review-important-music-superbly-delivered-classical-music/ Album cover for Skin. For over 30 years, NMC has staunchly championed a wide range of contemporary British composers, but so far has never released a record dedicated to the works of Rebecca Saunders. Over the past two decades, she has established herself as one of the leading figures of European music of our time. […]]]>
Album cover for Skin.

For over 30 years, NMC has staunchly championed a wide range of contemporary British composers, but so far has never released a record dedicated to the works of Rebecca Saunders. Over the past two decades, she has established herself as one of the leading figures of European music of our time. But perhaps because London-born Saunders lives in Berlin, she still receives too few performances in Britain. There has only been one of his works, for example, in the main series of the BBC Proms, and that was in 2009 – although his music was regularly featured at the Huddersfield Contemporary Music Festival.

This superb disc should win even more admirers at Saunders, as it includes one of his finest achievements: Skin for soprano and ensemble, which was composed in 2016 for Juliet Fraser, who is the outstanding vocalist here with Klangforum Wien . The text is Saunders’ own, incorporating an excerpt from Molly Bloom’s last monologue in Ulysses. (James Joyce, along with Samuel Beckett, has been a regular ingredient in Saunders’ music). , sometimes intensely fragile, sometimes furiously forged.

Like Skin, the other two works here – Void for two percussionists and orchestra, from 2014, and the string quartet Unbreathed from 2017 – are just as finicky in their attention to minute textural and tuning detail, but they inhabit different worlds. completely different music. Void is music of stark contrasts, pounding menace in the bass, and delicate microtonal hazes, as the quartet chart a path from violent confinement to silent final resolution. It’s all important music, superbly delivered.

The other choice of the week

Also new this month on NMC, a recording of two works by Richard Cauton. It includes the impressively held orchestral piece Ik zeg: NU, inspired by a family history written by a Dutch relative of the composer, and performed by the BBC Symphony Orchestra under the direction of Sakari Oramo. But the disc is dominated by a superb rendition by baritone Marcus Farnsworth and pianist Huw Watkins of the 40-minute La Terra Impareggiabile, directed by Sicilian poet Salvatore Quasimodo. Causton assembled the cycle between 1996 and 2007, then revised it four years ago to create a beautifully sweeping sequence of declamatory power and lyrical intimacy.

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Classical music: a choir meets to celebrate the return to normal https://iamwarmusic.com/classical-music-a-choir-meets-to-celebrate-the-return-to-normal/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 19:09:15 +0000 https://iamwarmusic.com/classical-music-a-choir-meets-to-celebrate-the-return-to-normal/ Breadcrumb Links Music local arts Entertainment The Vancouver Chamber Choir has staged a remarkable new event for this shrinking year’s choral calendar, a multi-choir extravaganza featuring half a dozen ensembles singing at the Orpheum. The Vancouver Chamber Choir organizes an extravaganza in November. Photo by Michelle Doherty /The edge of the diamond Reviews and recommendations […]]]>

The Vancouver Chamber Choir has staged a remarkable new event for this shrinking year’s choral calendar, a multi-choir extravaganza featuring half a dozen ensembles singing at the Orpheum.

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A choir party

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When: 2:30 p.m., November 27

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Where: Orpheum Theatre, Vancouver

Info and tickets: vancouverchamberchoir.com

The Vancouver Chamber Choir has staged a remarkable new event for this shrinking year’s choral calendar, a multi-choir extravaganza featuring half a dozen ensembles singing at the Orpheum.

The idea of ​​a large choral gathering has been in the works for over a year, initially a somewhat dreamy notion of what might be possible when musical life establishes some kind of normalcy.

“VCC Artistic Director Kari Turunen and I came up with the idea over a year ago, when it was just wishful thinking: why not do something choral and invite as many friends as possible? said general manager Steven Bélanger.

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Over the months, wishful thinking has turned into a well-defined possibility and now a practical reality.

The Chamber Choir has long enjoyed priority user status at the Orpheum and receives a civic grant to rent the theater for special occasions.

“The pandemic has been really deadly for choirs,” Bélanger said.

And the concept of a grand choral mash-up featuring ensembles that rarely sing at the Orpheum seemed particularly fitting after more than two years of struggle. The occasion to mark the resurgence of choral music after difficult times and to reflect on the diversity of our choral scene has become a true celebration.

The idea was to invite choirs, give each a segment of the afternoon program to present a sample of their particular repertoire, and then conclude with a piece or two that involved all the singers.

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Of course, there were some practical considerations.

“There’s a limit to how many people we can fit on the Orpheum stage, so it’s become a kind of tasting menu,” Bélanger said. “We would sing for each other without an audience if we had absolutely everyone.”

This time around, only small and medium-sized sets are involved. And in the future?

“If this proves successful, we will have established a framework for future collaborations,” Bélanger said.

The afternoon will begin with all the singers and Carry Tennant of the Vancouver Youth Choir led by Nitohtamok Askîy of Sherryl Sewepagaham, a composer of Cree-Dene ancestry from the Little Red River Cree Nation in northern Alberta and graduated from the music therapy program at Capilano University.

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Afterwards, Tennant’s own band stays on stage to sing a folk song from Indonesia and Northern Lights by Eriks Ešenvalds. The next set of Laudate Singers by Lars Kaario includes the oldest work in the program, Zefiro torna e’l bel tempo rimena from 1614.

The Vancouver Cantata Singers conducted by Paula Kremer complete the first part of the program with three 21st century works by Tracey Wong, Arvo Pärt and Hussein Janmohamed.

After the intermission there will be more contemporary music by Leslie Uyeda and Andrew Balfour of musica intima, then Mahler and Hrušovský of the Phoenix Chamber Choir, conducted by Dave Rosborough.

The Vancouver Chamber Choir ensemble includes a piece by Michael Dellairamore and one by Laura Hawley of Edmonton.

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Then comes the time for the grand finale as Turunen conducts the music of Mendelssohn and Rheinberger.

“We end with two pieces where everyone sings together,” said Bélanger. “Two hundred singers in the finale!”

BIS: There is more choral music at the Orpheum in early December. Christmas with the Bach Choir (2 p.m., December 4) is another extravaganza featuring eight VBC choirs. And then it’s the turn of the Vancouver Bach Choir to present Handel’s Messiah (7:30 pm, Dec. 10), with Leslie Dala conducting the choir, with a quartet of soloists and members of the Vancouver Opera Orchestra. Go to vancouverbachchoir.com for details.

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Lucerne Festival chief resigns – SlippediscSlippedisc https://iamwarmusic.com/lucerne-festival-chief-resigns-slippediscslippedisc/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 22:30:21 +0000 https://iamwarmusic.com/lucerne-festival-chief-resigns-slippediscslippedisc/ Norman Lebrecht November 21, 2022 Michael Haefliger will step down in 2025 after a quarter-century career. It achieved higher consistency and profile for the elite event, as well as higher prize money which bolstered the elite image. The festival orchestra conducted by Riccardo Chailly was a crowning glory. The quality of the pianists is limitless. […]]]>

Norman Lebrecht

November 21, 2022

Michael Haefliger will step down in 2025 after a quarter-century career.

It achieved higher consistency and profile for the elite event, as well as higher prize money which bolstered the elite image. The festival orchestra conducted by Riccardo Chailly was a crowning glory. The quality of the pianists is limitless. Here is the press release:

Michael Haefliger has decided not to extend his contract as executive and artistic director of the Lucerne Festival. The current contract runs until the end of 2025. The board has appointed a committee to conduct an international search for his successor.
Lucerne, November 21, 2022. Michael Haefliger, who has run the Lucerne Festival since 1999 with great success, has decided not to extend his contract. The current contract runs until the end of 2025. Haefliger says: “Naturally, this decision was not easy for me. But by the end of 2025, I will have directed the Lucerne Festival for 26 years. It’s been a very long time during which I’ve had the privilege, honor and pleasure of developing and shaping this unique festival. I am very proud and grateful for what we have been able to achieve during this time, together with the team and our many loyal partners, as well as with the support of the city and canton of Lucerne. This is the right time to pass this jewel into new hands. But before that, I’m going to dedicate myself to the Festival over the next three years with a lot of passion and energy — that hasn’t changed. I look forward to all that is yet to come.
The foundation board appointed a search committee to find a successor to Michael Haefliger. The committee includes board members — Markus Hongler (chairman), Christian Casal, Christoph Franz, executive adviser Marcel Schwerzmann and Anne Schwöbel — as well as Elisabeth Sobotka, artistic director of the Bregenz Festival, and Stefan Dohr, solo horn of the Berlin Philharmonic. The board expects to make its decision and announce Michael Haefliger’s successor by the fourth quarter of 2023.

photo: Daniel auf der Mauer

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Curtis Institute launches label | Classical music https://iamwarmusic.com/curtis-institute-launches-label-classical-music/ Thu, 17 Nov 2022 15:02:42 +0000 https://iamwarmusic.com/curtis-institute-launches-label-classical-music/ Renowned Philadelphia Conservatory The Curtis Institute of Music announced the launch of Curtis Studio, his own recording label dedicated “to discovering new and traditional works performed by the inspiring artists of our time”. The releases will feature performances by alumni, faculty, and students, and will be available on all major streaming platforms. Several releases will […]]]>

Renowned Philadelphia Conservatory The Curtis Institute of Music announced the launch of Curtis Studio, his own recording label dedicated “to discovering new and traditional works performed by the inspiring artists of our time”. The releases will feature performances by alumni, faculty, and students, and will be available on all major streaming platforms. Several releases will also contain music videos.

Curtis Studio kicks off with the Curtis Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Finnish maestro Osmo Vänskä, performing by Rimsky-Korsakov Scheherazade (release date: December 6, 2022). The performance was recorded as part of Curtis’ new performance facility Immersive Scheherazadewhich invited the public to sit alongside musicians performing the work while surrounded by 30-foot-tall projections of the orchestra.

Scheherazade demands musical virtuosity and showcases the magnificent artistry of the Curtis Symphony Orchestra,” says Vince Ford, Executive Producer of Curtis Studio. “These musicians represent a very bright future for classical music. We are thrilled to share their performances via Curtis Studio.

Curtis Institute of Music President and CEO Roberto Díaz said, “The three pillars of Curtis – teaching, touring and technology – will each be powered by this groundbreaking initiative. Curtis Studio presents an opportunity to share our rigorous level of musicality in an accessible way. This monumental initiative strengthens our digital presence while teaching the recording process as a fundamental part of a musician’s career.

The Curtis Institute regularly commissions established and emerging voices to create new music and explore new ideas. Recent commissions have included works by Bright Sheng, Jennifer Higdon, Richard Danielpour, Gabriella Smith and David Serkin Ludwig. Upcoming releases on Curtis Studio will include a solo piano recording with pianist Michelle Cann, featuring works by Florence Prize and Margaret Bonds. The Studio also plans to present several commissions, a recording premiere of the Zimbalist Trio and recordings of the Dover Quartet and other Curtis ensembles.

More broadly, the Curtis Institute is known for its “learn by doing” philosophy and a faculty that includes a high proportion of active musicians. It also bases admissions solely on artistic promise, meaning no student is turned away due to financial need. Every season, major opera houses and chamber music series around the world feature Curtis alumni, and they also occupy the principal chairs of every major American orchestra.

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The Handel and Haydn Society Announces New Artistic Director https://iamwarmusic.com/the-handel-and-haydn-society-announces-new-artistic-director/ Tue, 15 Nov 2022 14:44:51 +0000 https://iamwarmusic.com/the-handel-and-haydn-society-announces-new-artistic-director/ The US-based company Handel and Haydn Society announced that Jonathan Cohen will be its next artistic director. The Manchester-born conductor, cellist and keyboardist will succeed Harry Christophers, who stepped down in 2021 after 15 years as artistic director. Based in Boston, the Handel and Haydn Society is dedicated to the interpretation of music from the […]]]>

The US-based company Handel and Haydn Society announced that Jonathan Cohen will be its next artistic director. The Manchester-born conductor, cellist and keyboardist will succeed Harry Christophers, who stepped down in 2021 after 15 years as artistic director.

Based in Boston, the Handel and Haydn Society is dedicated to the interpretation of music from the Baroque and Classical eras. It has been active for over 200 years, giving its first performance in 1815. This history makes it the oldest arts organization in America. After Christophers – founder of The Sixteen, whom we named one of best choirs in the world – Cohen is the second successive British musician to take on the role of artistic director.

He would also be one of its youngest artistic directors, graduating from Clare College, Cambridge in 2000. Cohen was, was co-founder of the famous London Haydn Quartet: he also founded the UK-based early music ensemble Arcangelo.

Cohen calls this opportunity “a dream come true, allowing me to work collaboratively with some of the most talented and passionate musicians on the planet.” He will take on the role at the start of the 2023-24 concert season: however, he has already enjoyed a series of successful concerts with the Society, conducting performances of Vivaldi GloriaCPE Bach Magnificatand JS Bach’s Orchestral Suite No. 1.

“Jonathan understands that playing period instruments is not an academic exercise; it’s about performing that music with the freshness and vibrancy of new music,” adds David Snead, CEO of the Handel and Haydn Society. “From Jonathan’s first performances with Handel and Haydn, it was clear that his approach to music-making aligns powerfully with what H+H is all about.”

Photo of Jonathan Cohen by Marco Borggreve

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King Charles III’s love for classical music https://iamwarmusic.com/king-charles-iiis-love-for-classical-music/ Fri, 11 Nov 2022 23:40:45 +0000 https://iamwarmusic.com/king-charles-iiis-love-for-classical-music/ The musical tastes of King Charles III are more sophisticated than those of our late Queen. It’s not rude: it’s just a fact. Her favorite musician seems to have been George Formby, whose bubbly songs she knew by heart. No doubt she relished their double-meanings – but the hint of smut meant that, to her […]]]>

The musical tastes of King Charles III are more sophisticated than those of our late Queen. It’s not rude: it’s just a fact. Her favorite musician seems to have been George Formby, whose bubbly songs she knew by heart. No doubt she relished their double-meanings – but the hint of smut meant that, to her chagrin, she had to decline the presidency of the George Formby Society.

Our new monarch, on the other hand, adores the Piano Concerto in E flat major by Julius Benedict (1804-85). He recommended it in an interview a few years ago. I had never heard of the piece, which only existed in manuscript form until Howard Shelley and the Tasmanian Symphony Orchestra recorded it for Hyperion in 2008. So I have to thank our new king for having me alerted to this magnificent confection – not quite a masterpiece, but full of lovely tunes bound together by scintillating filigree passages that wear the poor pianist’s fingers to the bone.

I also didn’t know of the existence of Scylla and Glaucus, the only opera by Jean-Marie Leclair, a French composer of 18th century violin sonatas. The then Prince of Wales picked a scene of it when he appeared in Michael Berkeley private passions on Radio 3 in 2010, describing it as “incredibly upbeat and exciting” and “one of those pieces of music that give you a boost when you’re feeling a little down”.

Sometimes the guests of these programs bluff about their love of artful music chosen for them by someone else. (I once had to find some “personal favourites” for an iron-eared guest.) But the king’s problem will have been the opposite: narrowing down his most beloved pieces to a shortlist.

Charles III is the first British monarch in over 100 years for whom classical music is a passion

He is the first British monarch in over 100 years for whom classical music is a passion, and not just a private one. He is a patron of the Royal College of Music, the Philharmonia Orchestra, the English Chamber Orchestra and many other organizations. None are closer to his heart than the Monteverdi Choir, founded by his friend Sir John Eliot Gardiner, a gentleman-farmer with, conveniently, similar views to Charles. In 2000, Deutsche Grammophon terminated Gardiner’s cycle of Bach cantatas; he ended it by creating his own label, SDG. The richness of its products is a marvel; I suspect we’ll never know how much help he got from Charles.

Like any music lover, the King has obsessions. He is determined to rehabilitate Sir Hubert Parry, best known as the composer of the only holy anthem performed by drunks at bachelor parties and rugby club dinners. Charles even presented a BBC documentary highlighting that Parry, in addition to writing “Jerusalem”, “I was happy, the most beautiful pair of mermaids” and a staple of evening singing, wrote wonderfully for the orchestra. His later symphonies and symphonic variations would be better known were it not for Elgar, a young man born with the skills Parry worked hard to master. But maybe there was envy going both ways. Old Etonian Sir Hubert, whose family seat in Gloucestershire, Highnam Court, has some of the finest gardens in England, was what Elgar desperately wanted to be: a true country gentleman. Parry had surprisingly radical views, however, and beneath the conventional surfaces of his best music lurks an underground fire. Charles is his natural champion.

The king has been listening to symphonies and operas since he was a child, when he also learned piano, trumpet and cello. I wonder if this has contributed to bullying in Gordonstoun: in many schools, boys who like classical music walk around with targets on their backs. And I doubt it endeared him to his family. For the House of Windsor, serious music should stay where it belongs: in church, and they don’t want to hear anything they don’t already like.

But while Charles’s enthusiasms are unusual in his immediate family, things look different from a historical perspective. The Windsors are the anomaly. From the accession of Henry VII until the death of Edward VII, almost all English monarchs were music lovers. Henry VIII was a composer; he did not write ‘Greensleeves’ but 33 court manuscripts are attributed to him, brimming with talent. Ironically, he was responsible for the brutality of a Reformation that devastated musical life – but it came alive again under Elizabeth, who practiced the virginal religiously and commissioned music from William Byrd when he knew he was Catholic.

All Stuart monarchs were musicians. James I and Charles I presided over masks that rivaled those of the most lavish European courts. Under the later Stuarts, the Chapel Royal became a musical battleground. Protestants disliked Charles II’s penchant for instrumental music in church; James II, whose chapel royal was thoroughly Catholic, has been accused of trying to impose popish music on Anglicans. The Calvinist William III intended to ban instrumental accompaniment for hymns, but the temptation to commission Henry Purcell to write for trumpets and drums proved too great. Under Queen Anne, each day of victory or celebration was marked by a flamboyant hymn. And who better to write them than George Frederick Handel, who now lives in England after a falling out with his employer in Hanover?

The late Queen’s favorite seems to have been George Formby, whose warbling songs she knew by heart

In 1714, this employer became King George I; the fences were repaired and the first four Georges promoted the cult of Handel. George III organized private concerts of his music for which he wrote the programs with his own hand. It was only after Haydn’s visit to England that a composer enjoyed such fame. One of Haydn’s patrons was the future George IV, who employed his own orchestra and, according to Haydn, had “an extraordinary love of music”.

Victorian musical life seems dull in comparison. But never has there been a more music-obsessed royal couple than Victoria and Albert. They performed Beethoven’s symphonies in duet with piano; they accompanied themselves in songs by their favorite living composer, Mendelssohn, and were delighted to be visited by the “small, dark, Jewish-looking, delicate composer, with a fine intellectual brow”, as the queen described him. The Prince Consort and the composer shared a Lutheran faith and a love of Bach: it is thanks to Albert that the Passion according to Saint Matthew was first performed in Britain. Albert prepared the ground for the opening of the Royal College of Music by his son, the future Edward VII. ‘Bertie’ preferred the theatre, particularly actresses, but he left an indelible mark on British musical history. He liked to hum the trio section of Elgar’s first “March, Pump and Circumstance” and suggested that it be set to lyrics for his coronation. Hence ‘Land of Hope and Glory’.

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Curiously, for much of this period the position of master of music to the king or queen was relatively insignificant; the holder of the office when Victoria was crowned, a non-entity called Franz Cramer, could not even produce a coronation anthem – a failure described by The viewer in 1838 as “an attack on national honour”. But for the most part, that didn’t matter, because the true master of royal music was the monarch.

Composer Sir James MacMillan, who wrote a hymn for the Queen’s funeral, says our new King has “an intense and knowledgeable love of music, and its influence has already been felt in some of the liturgies we have seen in recent years”. It’s worth noting, given that even in the most difficult of circumstances, like the Duke of Edinburgh’s funeral during the pandemic, the music has been breathtaking. King Charles has promised not to meddle in politics, but music is another matter. So in that regard, this reign will be interesting. Or, as MacMillan puts it, “very fruitful for music.”

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Busy Week for Tucson Classical Music https://iamwarmusic.com/busy-week-for-tucson-classical-music/ Wed, 09 Nov 2022 22:00:00 +0000 https://iamwarmusic.com/busy-week-for-tucson-classical-music/ We have a busy week ahead for classical music in Tucson. Here’s what you need to know. The guest chef leads the SASO Egyptian conductor Ahmed El Saedi will be on the podium when the Southern Arizona Symphony Orchestra performs the second concert of its 2022-23 season this weekend. El Saedi, who also moonlights as […]]]>

We have a busy week ahead for classical music in Tucson. Here’s what you need to know.

The guest chef leads the SASO

Egyptian conductor Ahmed El Saedi will be on the podium when the Southern Arizona Symphony Orchestra performs the second concert of its 2022-23 season this weekend.

El Saedi, who also moonlights as a composer, is the longtime musical director and principal conductor of the Cairo Symphony Orchestra. SASO music director Linus Lerner said he met El Saedi several years ago at a music festival in Italy.

El Saedi will conduct the Tucson Volunteer Ensemble in a program that includes Mendelssohn’s “Hebride” Overture and Dvorák’s brilliant Eighth Symphony. Cello Concerto in D major.

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The orchestra will perform the concert twice this weekend: at 7:30 p.m. on Saturday, November 12, at the DesertView Performing Arts Center in SaddelBrooke, 39900 S. Clubhouse Drive; and 3 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 13 at St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church, 7650 N. Paseo Del Norte, Oro Valley. Tickets are $30 for SaddleBrooke via tickets.saddlebrooketwo.com; $25, free for ages 17 and under, for Oro Valley via sasomusic.org.

For more information, call 520-308-6226.

The symphonic winds salute the veterans

When you organize an event every year, it falls into the category of “annual events”.

When you do it for 37 years — without the COVID-19 break, which should never be held against anyone’s longevity record — you’re tradition.

On Friday, November 11, Tucson bandleader László Veres will lead his volunteer Arizona Symphonic Winds in their 37th Veterans Day Concert.

“We have been playing continuously since 1986; The year 2021 Covid-19 doesn’t count,” said Veres, who will don his ubiquitous John Phillip Sousa uniform for the occasion. “It’s become a Tucson tradition.”

The orchestra’s Veterans Day “Salute to Veterans” concert will feature Catalina Foothills High School senior Tyler Kebo as the marimba soloist in a program that includes “American Sketches ” by Barry Kopetz, “Colonial Scenes” by Tucson composer Mark Wolfram, Robert W. Smith. “American Flourish” and steps by John Philip Sousa.





The Arizona Symphonic Wind’s “Salute to Veterans” concert will feature Catalina Foothills High School senior Tyler Kebo as a marimba soloist.


Courtesy of Tucson Pops Orchestra


The Winds will also pay tribute to all members of the armed forces past and present with the “Armed Forces Salute”, a medley of songs representing all branches of service.

The 37th Annual Veterans Day Concert will begin at 2 p.m. Friday at Catalina Foothills High School Auditorium, 4300 E. Sunrise Drive. Free entry.

Friends of Arizona honor pianist

Two of the three members of the highly esteemed Kalichstein-Laredo-Robinson Trio will pay tribute to their late partner Joseph Kalichstein at a special concert with Arizona Friends of Chamber Music on Wednesday, November 16.

Kalichstein, the award-winning concert pianist who founded the trio in 1977, died last March at the age of 76.

Pianist Anna Polonsky will take the Kalichstein seat when her longtime trio mates, violinist Jaime Laredo and cellist Sharon Robinson, and violist/composer Nokuthula Ngwenyama perform a concert hosted by Kalichstein.

The program features the Arizona premiere of Ngwenyama’s new work “Elegy” for piano, violin, viola and cello, co-commissioned by Arizona Friends and several other presenters, including the Kennedy Center, and written in response to the 2020 Social Report .

In program notes released by the Kennedy Center, where the quartet performed the Oct. 18 concert, Kalichstein called “Elegy” “a heartbreaking tribute to the victims of racial prejudice and the struggle for equality and justice.” and said “there is something quite appropriate” associating “Elegy” with Dvorák’s E-flat Piano Quartet.

“Amazingly, (Dvorák) was one of the first champions of black American composers. And, as director of the newly created National Conservatory of Music in Lower Manhattan, he insisted that it would be open to women and people of color (not a given in the 1880s! ),” Kalichstein wrote.

Wednesday’s concert, which also includes Mozart’s Piano Quartet in G Minor, begins at 7:30 p.m. at the Leo Rich Theater, 260 S. Church Ave. Tickets are $32, $10 for students with ID, through arizonachambermusic.org or by calling 520-577-3769.

Sound technician Michael T Anderson presents a gift to longtime Tucson Pops Orchestra maestro László Veres during Veres’ final performance with the Tucson Pops Orchestra on June 12, 2022. Veres retired of the Tucson Pops Orchestra, which he had led for 32 years. Video by Rebecca Sasnett, Arizona Daily Star.



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Classical music matters at Duke https://iamwarmusic.com/classical-music-matters-at-duke/ Tue, 08 Nov 2022 05:00:00 +0000 https://iamwarmusic.com/classical-music-matters-at-duke/ At some point in our lives, many of us have been enthralled by the beautiful storytelling of Taylor Swift’s new albums or felt connected to the flashy, upbeat BTS music playing on the radio. Today’s singers and songwriters take advantage of modern music technology to capture and convey their feelings. Every element – the lyrics, […]]]>

At some point in our lives, many of us have been enthralled by the beautiful storytelling of Taylor Swift’s new albums or felt connected to the flashy, upbeat BTS music playing on the radio. Today’s singers and songwriters take advantage of modern music technology to capture and convey their feelings. Every element – the lyrics, the beats, the dynamics and even the music videos – contributes to the essence of this song.

However, we are unlikely to find a place for a piece like Brahms Symphony No.3 on Spotify’s curated playlist of today’s Top Hits.

I tried to keep my ears open when listening to different genres of music for distinctive settings and forms of musical expression. Just as we are concerned with the standard of living, we might also want to be concerned with the level of listening. Public appreciation for classical music should not deteriorate.

Certainly, I know few who doubt the ability of art – and, in particular, of classical music – to influence a moment or even an era. Even though classical music doesn’t usually make the Billboard Top 100, it introduces a unique discussion of historical contexts, proving that its independence from current music technology doesn’t take away from its value. And there’s so much more than that – it offers an emotional, harmonic and rhythmic range that no other music can match, from Bach’s sanctity to Mahler’s sarcasm. It is quite simply a treasure that deserves to be supported.

Earlier last month, the North Carolina Symphony Orchestra performed Beethoven’s Eroica Symphony at multiple locations in Raleigh and Cary. This piece was the revolutionary cornerstone. The underlying melody upon which Beethoven wove his elaborate tapestry of ideas was still perceptible beneath the surface. Listen to it! You can really feel the composer’s manifestation of the Enlightenment spirit, advocating free thought within rational boundaries. We see an artist’s political pursuit of an ideal society and his assertion of freedom.

Beethoven’s symphonies are often associated with freedom. During the French Revolution, the third symphony is dedicated to a heroic leader. During World War II, the opening notes of the fifth were tied to the morse code short-short-short-long for “V” (as in victory). In 1989, Leonard Bernstein led the Ninth near the fallen Berlin Wall. Listening to a great work like this allows us to understand the full picture of history instead of the one-dimensional view through historical texts.

Next month, the Duke Symphony Orchestra will perform Brahms’ Symphony No. 3. True to the satisfaction he finds in multiple purely Platonic pursuits in his life, Brahms has always pursued the essence of music from the pure instrumentality of Beethoven. This is in stark contrast to his contemporary Wagner, whose musical dramas are composed of elements from Shakespeare’s plays, Schopenhauer’s philosophy and Hitler’s ideology.

There are also many opportunities to listen to organ and chamber music at Duke. As part of Professor Harry Davidson’s music seminar (Composers of Influence), we have the chance to hear the university organist, Dr Robert Parkins, play a few pieces. Some people think the pipe organ is only suitable for playing hymns or “old” music, but in fact the repertoire covers most musical genres – from Bach’s whimsical fugues to Max Reger’s historicist modernism and more. by jazz-inspired pieces. You will be amazed at the HUGE variety of sounds the pipe organ is capable of producing!

The Danish String Quartet, which has been widely recognized as one of the greatest quartets in the world, also came to town the weekend of November 5. It was a packed house in the Baldwin Auditorium for this amazing band – and certainly one of the finest live shows. most Mozart quartet in E flat major that I have ever heard!

The only problem is that over eighty percent of the audience were seniors instead of Duke students.

If we continue to receive stereotypical musical codes that are emptied of their richest treasures, we will be the losers. I’m not saying that everyone should become a classical music enthusiast. But I still encourage you to go see Duke Performances, come to Baldwin Auditorium and Duke Chapel, and put your student discount to good use (only $10 to listen to guest artists).

Even though classical music, to some extent, seems to be dying publicly in the modern world, it still vibrates with life and remains capable of changing lives. We shouldn’t be embarrassed to embrace this belief. The way we listen is a reflection of the way we live, regardless of the size of their audience or if they have a prime time awards show. With our ears and our imagination, classical music gives us the tremendous ability to understand the strengths and limitations of human conditions.

Sophie Ju is a freshman from Trinity. His column usually runs on alternate Mondays.

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Reviews of the best classical music concerts of November 2022 in Britain https://iamwarmusic.com/reviews-of-the-best-classical-music-concerts-of-november-2022-in-britain/ Sat, 05 Nov 2022 15:25:00 +0000 https://iamwarmusic.com/reviews-of-the-best-classical-music-concerts-of-november-2022-in-britain/ Increasing diversity may be the long-term strategy for winning new audiences for classical music, but in the meantime, busy managers know there’s no such thing as the “dream ticket” of an international orchestra. leading and a leading soloist to attract bettors. It certainly worked its magic on Friday night, when what many consider to be […]]]>

Increasing diversity may be the long-term strategy for winning new audiences for classical music, but in the meantime, busy managers know there’s no such thing as the “dream ticket” of an international orchestra. leading and a leading soloist to attract bettors. It certainly worked its magic on Friday night, when what many consider to be the best orchestra in the world, Amsterdam’s Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra, was joined by Leonidas Kavakos, arguably the world’s most bankable violinist. Before the concert, the crowded foyers had this fever of excitement that I haven’t felt since those distant pre-Covid days.

The exorbitant expectations of bettors were well rewarded, with a program that certainly did not mark any adventurous side: Brahms’ Violin Concerto and Beethoven’s Pastoral Symphony. For that very reason, it was received with particular delight, as it felt like a defiant assertion of the value of maintaining a great tradition – something the Arts Council of England no longer believes in, judging by funding decisions it made on Friday. When the orchestra conducted by Daniel Harding settled almost timidly into the soft opening of Brahms’ concerto, one could already feel the sleeping power in the orchestra, which quickly burst forth. This powerful buildup led to the explosive entry of Kavakos, who had exactly the magnificent and tragically heroic quality one hopes for.

This reminded us of the superhuman strength of your Kavakos tone, but would it also be sensitive to the tender and intimate side of this multifaceted work? Yes, was the answer, but in this respect he shared the honors with the orchestra. Even when Kavakos was in full flight, my attention was often grabbed by an expressive bassoon or viola phrase. Even Kavakos cannot overshadow the Concertgebouw. The fruity richness of the playing and the sensitive molding of Harding’s tempos meant that details I’d never noticed – like the moment the music slips into the sensually swaying world of Brahms’ Liebeslieder (Love Song) waltzes – suddenly shines.

As for Beethoven’s Pastoral Symphony, Harding conducted a rendition of rich, easy amplitude that with a lesser orchestra might have seemed sluggish, but with this vintage Rolls-Royce it sounded beautifully spacious. This meant that in moments of peasant rowdiness, when the horns blew and the fiddles cavorted, the contrast really sat up. My only caveat is that the innocently swinging final movement got so relaxed towards the end that I thought it might actually stop. But really, it was a wonderful evening. If you’re free tonight and can attend the second Concertgebouw concert, drop everything and go.


The Royal Concertgebouw is at the Barbican tonight at 7.30pm; barbican.org.uk

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Residents of Otterbein Granville organize classical music series https://iamwarmusic.com/residents-of-otterbein-granville-organize-classical-music-series/ Thu, 03 Nov 2022 05:07:34 +0000 https://iamwarmusic.com/residents-of-otterbein-granville-organize-classical-music-series/ Granville Sentinel Special | USA TODAY NETWORK The residents of Otterbein Granville have organized a nine-month classical music series featuring exceptional musicians who represent the pinnacle of their various fields. The Sunday Chamber Music Series will offer a cavalcade of talent that would make a major metropolitan music hall proud – not forgetting the Amelia […]]]>

The residents of Otterbein Granville have organized a nine-month classical music series featuring exceptional musicians who represent the pinnacle of their various fields.

The Sunday Chamber Music Series will offer a cavalcade of talent that would make a major metropolitan music hall proud – not forgetting the Amelia Gathering Room in Otterbein Granville.

It all started with Max Rabinovitsj, who together with his wife Mary Trevor moved to Otterbein in 2021, bringing a lifetime musical experience to the community. It didn’t take long for Rabinovitsj – himself a professional bandleader and musician – to discern a way to give an extraordinary gift to his and Trevor’s new community. They saw an opportunity to tap into their many friends, contacts and musical networks to attract world-class talent to Otterbein that would delight residents and give Otterbein Granville a unique artistic edge.

Rabinovitsj shared his vision and possibilities with some friends of Otterbein, who last spring formed the new Otterbein Classical Music Committee under the Otterbein Granville Residents Association. Since then, the committee has worked with Rabinovitsj to work out the myriad details involved in putting together the monthly Artist Series. Rabinovitsj himself was busy recruiting the musicians, aided by committee member Larry Murdock, who served as liaison between the committee and the music department at Denison University. Of the nine concerts in the series, three feature artists whose careers have earned them appointments at Denison.

There will be one Sunday concert per month. Performances are scheduled for approximately one hour and 15 minutes, and a reception will usually follow. At this time, concert attendance will only be available to Otterbein residents and their family members due to capacity restrictions.

The series’ inaugural concert took place on Sunday, October 16, and featured Israeli-American pianist Dror Biran, an award-winning musician who is an associate professor of piano at the University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music. Biran performs internationally with large orchestras as well as smaller ensembles. A Otterbein, interpreted The Well-Tempered Clavier by Johann Sebastian Bach, Book 1, I-XII (BWV 846-857).

In November, the famous American violinist Isabelle Ai Durrenberger will present a program of works by Clara Schumann, Grażyna Bacewicz, Maurice Ravel, Edward Elgar and Edvard Grieg. Durrenberger has collaborated with many American orchestras and performed at Carnegie Hall as a member of the New York String Orchestra Seminar. She will be joined on stage by pianist Hana Chu, who performs frequently with several chamber groups in various parts of the world, including Jordan, Kyrgyzstan, Thailand and South Korea. She recently joined the piano faculty at Denison University.

“Otterbein Granville is a resident-led retirement community, where residents plan and execute all activities and events,” said Derik Kroeze, Chief Marketing Officer at Otterbein Granville. “We believe this has created our unique culture, with a level of engagement and enrichment not found elsewhere. Residents saw the need for this Sunday chamber music series and worked hard to make it a reality.”

The Sunday Chamber Music Series promises to be a treasure trove for music lovers and a mark of distinction for Otterbein Granville.

Information submitted by Otterbein Granville.

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