Modern music – I Am War Music http://iamwarmusic.com/ Thu, 30 Dec 2021 04:43:15 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://iamwarmusic.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/profile.png Modern music – I Am War Music http://iamwarmusic.com/ 32 32 BYGMusic, a Modern Music Company Helping Emerging Artists Make Money, Launches Equity Crowdfunding Campaign https://iamwarmusic.com/bygmusic-a-modern-music-company-helping-emerging-artists-make-money-launches-equity-crowdfunding-campaign/ Thu, 30 Dec 2021 01:47:17 +0000 https://iamwarmusic.com/bygmusic-a-modern-music-company-helping-emerging-artists-make-money-launches-equity-crowdfunding-campaign/ Los Angeles, California – December 29, 2021 – BYGMusic, a music company that provides a platform for emerging artists to earn money by paying them to support brands and deliver brand messages, has launched a crowdfunding campaign on Wefunder. The Los Angeles-based company has set a goal of raising $ 500,000 through the crowdfunding campaign […]]]>

Los Angeles, California – December 29, 2021 – BYGMusic, a music company that provides a platform for emerging artists to earn money by paying them to support brands and deliver brand messages, has launched a crowdfunding campaign on Wefunder. The Los Angeles-based company has set a goal of raising $ 500,000 through the crowdfunding campaign as part of a larger capital increase.

Founded in 2015 by GRAMMY triple-awarded producer Krish Sharma, BYGMusic pays artists who support brands and spread their messages. BYGMusic pairs the artist with the perfect brand for a natural fit; a revolutionary concept that fills the need for artist support that was once provided by the recording industry. Since its launch, BYGMusic has helped emerging artists earn $ 1.5 million in sponsorship revenue.

For brands, BYGMusic is able to activate a cohort of artists simultaneously for highly engaged brand campaigns. The BYGMusic platform streamlines campaigns and allows brands to interact with large groups of artists “as one”, bringing superstar reach within reach of any corporate brand.

“As a producer and mixer I have been fortunate to work with many major artists like the Rolling Stones, Ziggy Marley and Hillary Duff – but my passion has been to help and develop emerging artists,” said Sharma. “From songwriting to recording in the studio, to accessing the major record company system, my experience has shown me how difficult it is for independent artists to gain a foothold in the industry. music industry; and how the level of label support for independent artists has declined since the Napster revolution. ”

BYGMusic recently expanded its business to now offer a mission-driven, subscription-based online platform that will provide the systems, tools and revenue necessary to support artists’ careers. The new platform will allow independent and emerging artists to access the creative tools that music artists need but that are missing from other creator platforms, including unique paid sponsorship opportunities typically reserved for artists. major record companies; an integrated data dashboard for an artist’s digital social and musical touchpoints; Support for live streaming, VR, AR and NFT; and the continued growth of multiplatform social engagement. “My aha moment came when I realized that some of the most valuable tools for artists to develop their careers – such as corporate sponsorship and information about their own fan base data – are missing from the platforms. current creators, and by providing them we could really make an impact for artists and as a business, ”said Sharma.

That’s why I started BYGMusic and that’s why we’re committed to connecting new artists with brands to provide them with the resources they need to continue making the music the world needs. Artists who sign up for these services will join the BYGMusic Network of Emerging Artists – an interconnected community that is set to become the largest network of independent artists and music fans. BYGMusic is structured to work well with labels and agencies, any artist who wishes to benefit from brand sponsorship can join.

“We see BYGMusic becoming a universal platform for artists and stakeholders to connect,” said Mike Alden, co-founder and president of BYGMusic. “Our proprietary process analyzes and matches opportunities with the appropriate BYG artists in the network, so we ultimately create a place where any stakeholder can easily access and leverage our large-scale network – for content distribution, monetization. advertising and beyond. ”

For more information on BYGMusic, visit the company’s Wefunder page.

About BYGMusic:

Founded in 2015 by GRAMMY award-winning producer Krish Sharma, BYGMusic is a modern music company that bridges the gap between technology and old-school artist development and support. They recruit the best emerging artists from around the world based on talent, fan reach and potential, with the aim of providing support and growth while preserving the integrity of the creative production and protecting all property ownership. the artist. BYGMUSIC and its sponsors value all visionary artists – big or small, established or new – and have created a new revenue channel for them.

Media contact
Company Name: BYGMusic
Contact: Krish sharma
E-mail: Send an email
Call: (323) 886-2946
Address:1140 Highland Avenue, Unit 169
City: manhattan beach
State: CA 90266
Country: United States
Website: https://bygmusic.com/


Source link

]]>
Modern Music Masters book series launches seventh edition https://iamwarmusic.com/modern-music-masters-book-series-launches-seventh-edition/ Wed, 15 Dec 2021 17:57:28 +0000 https://iamwarmusic.com/modern-music-masters-book-series-launches-seventh-edition/ The Modern Music Masters book series has released its seventh title: Paul Weller – The Solo Years. Tom Boniface-Webb’s series, which documents the careers of iconic musical acts in the context of the political and social environments of their time, now features the story of influential Britpop artist Paul Weller. Undoubtedly one of Britain’s greatest […]]]>

The Modern Music Masters book series has released its seventh title: Paul Weller – The Solo Years.

Tom Boniface-Webb’s series, which documents the careers of iconic musical acts in the context of the political and social environments of their time, now features the story of influential Britpop artist Paul Weller.

Undoubtedly one of Britain’s greatest songwriters, Paul Weller made his debut on the music scene at the age of just 19 as a member of mod / punk group The Jam. After their split, Weller started The Style Council, then went solo – becoming one of the most successful groups in UK chart history and inspiring many other artists who came after them, earning their name from The Modfather.

Now published in their second edition, and in partnership with Official Charts Company, ‘Modern Music Masters’ is a series of books about artists you know and love, or are new to. With a strong emphasis on the UK charts, placing artists in a social and political environment, MMM does not claim to be exhaustive, but offers an accessible route through music and history.

Order Modern Music Masters – Paul Weller – The Solo Years here.

Check out the rest of the Modern Music Masters series here.


Source link

]]>
Educational manager position at BIMM, THE BRITISH AND IRISH MODERN MUSIC INSTITUTE https://iamwarmusic.com/educational-manager-position-at-bimm-the-british-and-irish-modern-music-institute/ Wed, 15 Dec 2021 11:04:18 +0000 https://iamwarmusic.com/educational-manager-position-at-bimm-the-british-and-irish-modern-music-institute/ The incumbent will be a very experienced and dynamic professional with a solid background in education who will be responsible for the direction, coordination and delivery of all academic activities at ICTheatre Brighton. The successful candidate will be directly responsible for the quality of program delivery, as well as student success and progression rates. ICTheatre […]]]>

The incumbent will be a very experienced and dynamic professional with a solid background in education who will be responsible for the direction, coordination and delivery of all academic activities at ICTheatre Brighton. The successful candidate will be directly responsible for the quality of program delivery, as well as student success and progression rates. ICTheatre is a professional college and an ability to understand and effectively manage creative professional artists is vital.

You must be a team player and used to working under tight deadlines and ensuring that both staff and students are able to meet rigorous standards of educational excellence.

This position reports directly to the College Director, but will be supported by the Executive Director of ICTheatre Performing Arts and members of the broader executive team.

Essential criteria for the applicant

Relevant experience in higher education management

Knowledge of UK higher education contexts and settings

Experience in managing large teams

Excellent interpersonal, communication and negotiation skills

Strong experience in delivering quality teaching and learning, including a teaching qualification

Ability to work with complex administrative tasks and systems such as scheduling and exam procedures

Strong level of computer skills including Excel, Word, etc.

Desirable criteria for the candidate

Excellent performing arts skills and industry experience

Experience in project management

Working knowledge of the contemporary performing arts industry internationally and in the UK

Main responsibilities

Management and delivery of the study program

Responsible for the management and coordination of all course leaders, keynote speakers and lecturers, as it relates to program delivery

Lead and support all members of the teaching team in upholding the ethics and mission of ICTheatre to ensure a performing arts education that will enable all students to establish successful careers in the domain.

Work with teaching teams from other ICTheater campuses to ensure parity, oversee the quality of the offering and provide mentoring support

Direct online management of course managers and teaching staff in the ICTheatre

Ensure the highest quality of delivery for all study programs in accordance with the requirements of ICTheatre’s educational partners

Support the creation and management of the scheduling process, providing approved, student-centered schedules for all courses

Ensure that all lectures are covered by the appropriate teaching staff, including arranging assistant tutors if necessary

Ensure that all staff are trained and supported in the use of ICTheatre VLE systems

Support course managers to ensure that new teacher onboarding procedures are followed, including GDPR protection and training

Work with the education team to improve systems and communication (e.g. production of newsletters for faculty, engagement, etc.)

Support teaching staff by creating feedback spaces and responding to requests for assistance from teachers

· Production and management of the teaching budget, the guest budget in class and the tutorial budget

Review monthly payment requests, faculty invoices and overtime claims

Guarantee the quality of teaching and learning

Ensure that all members of the teaching team are observed and promote the development of strong teaching and learning strategies to ensure the full engagement and success of all students

Oversee and be responsible for review and assessment modalities in accordance with published ICTheatre procedures, certification body and partner requirements, including: scheduling, assignment notes, feedback on evaluation, scoring, moderation and repeats

Coordinate the ICTheatre PGCert engagement in collaboration with the PGCert team

Work closely with the ICTheatre ADQA team (academic development and quality assurance) to ensure that all courses are delivered in accordance with agreed policies and procedures

Contribute to committee meetings within the academic structure of the group on strategic and operational decisions

Oversee the annual review of all programs and submit monitoring documentation and action plans to the Director / Head of Berlin College as required

Supervise and enter the manuals and manuals of the ES

Quality of the student experience

Ensure that all students have access to regular academic, professional and pastoral tutorials in accordance with the tutoring policy

· Work with the ICTheatre administration team to monitor attendance and respond quickly to absenteeism.

Develop and promote a biannual program of ICTheatre extracurricular events

Work with the Head of Student Services and Course Leaders to monitor learner satisfaction levels, including obtaining student feedback through regular satisfaction surveys, focus groups, SRFs and commissions studies, providing reports and action plans as needed

Quality Assurance and Annual Monitoring

Oversee the completion of the college’s annual monitoring report and action plan, including providing guidance and support to course leaders in creating annual reports for course leaders

Work with course leaders to respond to reports from external reviewers

Support the development of course documentation in consultation with other ICTheatre colleagues and to be approved by the academic committee

Ensure the accuracy of course documentation available through ICTheatre VLE

Represent ICTheatre on group-wide committees as needed

Produce statistical reports as needed

Assessment and exams

Support the ICTheatre exam teams to ensure that accurate and timely data is provided to the exam boards, and that all relevant academic tasks and requirements are met, as applicable

· Liaise with student support professionals to support learners with additional learning support needs.

Support moderation procedures in collaboration with all course leaders and the exam team (including assisting with the scoring and moderation process during peak periods)

Provide guidance and training on grading and moderation procedures for teaching staff

Maintain an up-to-date understanding of IC THEATER and partner evaluation regulations

Work with the higher education administrator to ensure accurate recording of student enrollment and assessment data, including module choices

NB: This is not a complete statement of all the duties and responsibilities of this position. The incumbent may be required to perform other tasks related to the nature of the post, as instructed and in agreement with his supervisor.

We are committed to establishing a culture of inclusiveness across the BIMM Institute, so that we truly represent the diversity of our students and the creative industries, both in what we teach and in the way we work. We encourage applications from black and ethnic minority applicants who are under-represented in our organization.

All messages are subject to labor law and DBS controls


Source link

]]>
“Modern music is like junk food, it’s everywhere”: lyricist Sameer Anjaan https://iamwarmusic.com/modern-music-is-like-junk-food-its-everywhere-lyricist-sameer-anjaan/ Mon, 13 Dec 2021 07:00:57 +0000 https://iamwarmusic.com/modern-music-is-like-junk-food-its-everywhere-lyricist-sameer-anjaan/ Lyricist Sameer Anjaan has been in the industry for many decades now, having given us several hit songs in films from the 80s, 90s, early 2000s and also the current decade. The ace songwriter, however, is also aware that the music in Indian films has changed now, and that there is more attention given to […]]]>

Lyricist Sameer Anjaan has been in the industry for many decades now, having given us several hit songs in films from the 80s, 90s, early 2000s and also the current decade. The ace songwriter, however, is also aware that the music in Indian films has changed now, and that there is more attention given to the “sound” than the actual “lyrics” of a song.

In a press release, the lyricist mentioned that he had always “dreamed of teaching people to be songwriters.” “There are a lot of nuances to consider when writing lyrics, but if you know how to approach whatever challenges you come up with, you can really be good at it. “

The Guinness World Record Holder recently interacted with indianexpress.com, and spoke more about running an exclusive Unlu course to teach aspiring songwriters how to write lyrics, the new wave of “modern music”, and so on. He regretted that nowadays people want the song to be ready without taking into account the nuances of the lyrics, resulting in some deterioration of the “lyrical value”. Extracts:

Do you think the pandemic has changed the way people consume and enjoy music these days?

I have been in the industry for over 40 years now. I have seen a drastic change in the music industry. Yes, definitely the pandemic has changed the way people consume and enjoy music. During the pandemic, it was largely just the music that kept people sane in sad and lonely times. It was during the pandemic that people came to understand different aspects of music.

What is your take on modern music, especially the one we see in Bollywood movies now, from a purely lyrical point of view?

As a lyricist, I feel like the change that has happened now is known as “modern music”. The new generation brings its own mentality, its own color and its own thought process. I believe the lyrical value is changing and deteriorating now and the sound is gaining in importance. It’s more like junk food like it’s everywhere, but the audience needs a new sound. This is not good for the future, however. At the start of my career, the music industry was too different. Every 25 years the music industry changes because of the new style coming up.

During your long and illustrious career, what are the obvious changes that you have witnessed in the industry, both good and bad?

There has been a major change. Previously the details were given more attention, but now they just want the music ready.

You are the Guinness World Record Holder for writing the most songs. Do you also encounter creative blockages? How do you treat them?

Now there is a creative block, no attention is paid to the story line. Producers and directors are not ready to discuss their scripts for the music. I try to hold back from these creative blockages.

Lyricist has an exclusive course on Unlu to teach songwriting to budding songwriters. (Photo: public relations document)

In your opinion, how has the pandemic affected the Indian music industry, and in the future, what can we expect?

The music industry suffered a major loss during the pandemic. Now we are all trying to cope with the effect that has been caused to all of us including the creators, music directors, etc. However, the damage is done.

Through your lyric writing course, what would you like aspiring songwriters to learn first?

I joined Unlu because I wanted to share my experience, my mantra for success. It’s the right platform to connect with aspiring songwriters and give them the most you can.

A myth about writing songs that you want to demystify …

At the start of my career math was fixed for songwriting, it wasn’t too open or flexible like it is now. But now you have to be open to new trends and new ideas.

While you’ve worked with some of the best songwriters in the business, is there anyone you’d like to collaborate with again, or someone whose craft you particularly enjoy?

My best collaboration has been with three musical directors Nadeem-Shravan, Himesh Reshammiya and Anand Milind. As I have worked with them for a very long time and frequently. I would love to collaborate with them again in the future because their craft matches my writing. We tend to be on the same page mentally and our thought processes are similar to each other.

Can you tell us about your own initial difficulties when you were a newcomer? How much have things changed now?

My career graph has been odd, as I come from a very middle class family from a small village. It was a big fight for me to find a place in the industry. At first, I fought my battles alone. I started by working in a bank, then I came to Mumbai. It has been a difficult time for over eight years for me. Because there were already big names and legends who made their mark in songwriting. My father was a songwriter himself, so I learned a lot from him.

I have had my own ups and downs in my career. I have proven myself time and time again. I believe that a designer never gets old, because his job only gets better. Everyone in the industry has their own story, you have to be mentally prepared for whatever happens. Today’s generation is not ready for the drudgery that one has to go through to be successful due to lack of patience.

?? For more lifestyle news, follow us on Instagram | Twitter | Facebook and don’t miss the latest updates!



Source link

]]>
Live at the Pulitzer Series Gives Musicians of SLSO Modern Music a Chance to Shine | Entertainment https://iamwarmusic.com/live-at-the-pulitzer-series-gives-musicians-of-slso-modern-music-a-chance-to-shine-entertainment/ Thu, 02 Dec 2021 18:44:00 +0000 https://iamwarmusic.com/live-at-the-pulitzer-series-gives-musicians-of-slso-modern-music-a-chance-to-shine-entertainment/ The Pulitzer Arts Foundation has a performance space with excellent acoustics for string music, as evidenced by the annual Live at the Pulitzer concerts of the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra. This season’s series kicked off Tuesday and Wednesday nights with SLSO violinists Xiaoxiao Qiang and Eva Kozma, violist Shannon Williams and cellist Jennifer Humphreys. Unfortunately, […]]]>

The Pulitzer Arts Foundation has a performance space with excellent acoustics for string music, as evidenced by the annual Live at the Pulitzer concerts of the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra.

This season’s series kicked off Tuesday and Wednesday nights with SLSO violinists Xiaoxiao Qiang and Eva Kozma, violist Shannon Williams and cellist Jennifer Humphreys.

Unfortunately, this space is in some ways hostile to the public. The seats are on folding chairs on the landings of a staircase, so it is difficult to see the performers down the stairs or behind the audience, as was the case with the first and last plays. And the same acoustics that made music so beautiful made amplified narration filtered through indecipherable masks.

It remains a remarkable museum, and the contemporary chamber music series, begun in 2002, has met with great success. The concerts coincided with an exhibition by Hannah Wilke; the season is organized by SLSO’s creative partner, Tim Munro.

The two pieces performed behind the audience were “Whoever You Are Come Forth” by Kate Moore, a cello solo that opened the concert, and “Rest These Hands” by Anna Clyne (from “The Violin”), a solo by violin which was a tribute to the composer’s mother and closed the concert. Both featured slow melodies of long notes, which in Clyne’s room made it seem like the melody was not breathing. Moore’s play was sad and even a little scary, and Clyne is also exotic and sad. The two were the occasion for their interpreters, Humphreys and Qiang respectively, to show a particularly beautiful timbre.


Source link

]]>
Win a set of four Modern Music Masters books https://iamwarmusic.com/win-a-set-of-four-modern-music-masters-books/ Wed, 01 Dec 2021 17:28:30 +0000 https://iamwarmusic.com/win-a-set-of-four-modern-music-masters-books/ The Modern Music Masters book series has released its seventh title: Paul Weller – The Solo Years. Tom Boniface-Webb’s series, which documents the careers of iconic musical acts in the context of the political and social environments of their time, now features the story of influential Britpop artist Paul Weller. Undoubtedly one of Britain’s greatest […]]]>

The Modern Music Masters book series has released its seventh title: Paul Weller – The Solo Years.

Tom Boniface-Webb’s series, which documents the careers of iconic musical acts in the context of the political and social environments of their time, now features the story of influential Britpop artist Paul Weller.

Undoubtedly one of Britain’s greatest songwriters, Paul Weller made his debut on the music scene at the age of just 19 as a member of mod / punk group The Jam. After their split, Weller started The Style Council, then went solo – becoming one of the most successful groups in UK chart history and inspiring many other artists who came after them, earning their name from The Modfather.

Now published in their second edition, and in partnership with Official Charts Company, ‘Modern Music Masters’ is a series of books about artists you know and love, or are new to. With a strong emphasis on the UK charts, placing artists in a social and political environment, MMM does not claim to be exhaustive, but offers an accessible route through music and history.

To celebrate the launch of this new title, we’re giving away three sets of four Modern Music Masters books: Paul Weller, Oasis, Pulp and Blur.

The contest ends on Saturday December 11, 2021 at 11:00 GMT. To have a chance to win, enter your details in the registration form as well as the correct answer to the contest question below. Good luck!

Order here Modern Music Masters – Paul Weller – The Solo Years.


Source link

]]>
Modern music performed in traditional styles https://iamwarmusic.com/modern-music-performed-in-traditional-styles/ Thu, 25 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://iamwarmusic.com/modern-music-performed-in-traditional-styles/ RETRO — The cast members perform “Postmodern Jukebox”. Courtesy photo Nowadays, new musical groups are becoming popular not through “archaic” media like radio and records, but on YouTube. In the past decade, there has been no greater beneficiary of this than Postmodern Jukebox, a perfect example of a guy with a unique vision who made […]]]>

RETRO — The cast members perform “Postmodern Jukebox”. Courtesy photo

Nowadays, new musical groups are becoming popular not through “archaic” media like radio and records, but on YouTube. In the past decade, there has been no greater beneficiary of this than Postmodern Jukebox, a perfect example of a guy with a unique vision who made him grow all over the world and is acclaimed by the world. critical.

The group was born from the idea of ​​Scott Bradlee, a jazz pianist and arranger who, in 2009, had the idea of ​​incorporating the ragtime piano into popular hits of the 1980s. Like many other aspiring musicians , Bradlee had a regular gig at a local restaurant, where he refined his idea and in 2013 had formed PMJ (its short name), a collective of rotating musicians who perform covers of pop songs in more traditional styles such as as ragtime, swing and soul.

Bradlee calls PMJ “an alternate universe where songs of today were written half a century ago.” When the media started posting about Bradlee’s new creation, the group’s YouTube videos went viral. By 2018, they had reached one billion views.

Today, after 18 months of inactivity due to the pandemic, Bradlee and PMJ embarked on their “Grand Reopening Tour”. The latest incarnation of their show took place at the Kavli Theater on November 19 to a packed house of enthusiastic fans, many of whom celebrated “Dapper Day” by donning stylish and retro glamorous outfits.

The master of ceremonies for the concert was Rogelio Douglas Jr., a multi-talented artist who sometimes evoked the memory of the late Jackie Wilson, with acrobatic spins and lunges as he sang songs such as “Radioactive” by Imagine Dragons in the 1940s big band. style or soulful rendition of Kings of Leon’s “Use Somebody”.

Douglas’ performances were alternated with those of three female singers, all with chevron-level vocals that brought PMJ audiences to their collective feet on several occasions throughout the evening. The best of the three was Allison Young, an elegant raven-haired singer who toned down ELO’s signature song “Mr. Blue Sky”, turning it into a flaming saloon song. In Young’s hands, the propellant “Are You” Australian rock band Jet’s Gonna Be My Girl becomes a seductive, swinging track by Peggy Lee, while the Pixies ‘”Where Is My Mind” was sung in Roy Orbison’s’ 60s drama style.

The other two singers, Tia Simone and “Jack Dani” Armstrong, performed practically interchangeable numbers. Everyone can sing everything, from bawdy burlesque to jazz, soul and R&B. Armstrong, looking like Cruella de Vil in a black and white polka dot dress and fireman’s red hair, blew up the roof of the theater with raucous performances of Sia’s “Chandelier” and Lizzo’s “Juice.” Simone was explosive with a blues cover of Metallica’s “Nothing Else Matters”.

The breadth of Bradlee’s arrangements is astounding. He is able to draw musicality from contemporary songs that would otherwise be inaccessible to a more tradition-conscious audience. He created a whole new repertoire for his bands without having to write anything original. It’s a fancy concept, but it works. Bradlee made a cameo appearance on Kavli’s show, responding to audience requests and improvising piano songs from Billy Joel, Britney Spears and Pink Floyd.

None of this would be possible without PMJ’s tense and talented six-piece band, led by bassist Adam Kubota, comprising versatile pianist Reggie Berg, explosive trombonist JP Floyd, guitarist and banjo specialist Mike Chisnall (who has announced his recent marriage to Armstrong), drummer Tom Jorgensen, and even a tap specialist.

PMJ ended with a mind-blowing gospel rendition of U2’s “I Still Haven’t Found What I’m Looking For”, followed by callbacks to Meghan Trainor’s “All About That Bass” and an evolution of the show’s theme. TV show “Friends,” in successive styles spanning 70 years.


Source link

]]>
Where modern music was born in New Orleans https://iamwarmusic.com/where-modern-music-was-born-in-new-orleans/ Fri, 19 Nov 2021 14:45:40 +0000 https://iamwarmusic.com/where-modern-music-was-born-in-new-orleans/ In his flagship novel, On the road, jazz enthusiast Jack Kerouac writes: “Once upon a time, Louis Armstrong blew his beautiful spinning top in the mud of New Orleans; before him, the crazy musicians who marched on official days and split their Sousa marches into ragtime. Then there was the swing, and Roy Eldridge, vigorous […]]]>

In his flagship novel, On the road, jazz enthusiast Jack Kerouac writes: “Once upon a time, Louis Armstrong blew his beautiful spinning top in the mud of New Orleans; before him, the crazy musicians who marched on official days and split their Sousa marches into ragtime. Then there was the swing, and Roy Eldridge, vigorous and manly, blasting the horn for all he had in waves of power, logic and subtlety – leaning over it with shining eyes and a cute smile. and sending it to broadcast to thrill the world of jazz. “

Indeed, the streets of New Orleans have given the world so much jazz, but jazz is only the influential first portion of the melting pot of modern music, and this giant sonic cauldron sits right in the thick of it. New Orleans. For even Louis Armstrong blowing on his magnificent spinning top leaves a trail behind him, just as he illuminates the way forward.

Besides his Jazz, Louis Armstrong was synonymous with something else: his secret universe smile. It is indeed a smile that seems to embody the warm ways of the bustling city that spawned it. And when it comes to the secret of the universe, Armstrong would tell you he stumbled upon it at a young age; exactly six years, in fact.

He was one of the lucky few in New Orleans to witness the cloud changes of the mythical father of jazz: Buddy Bolden. Now Bolden’s records are so tattered, and the day-to-day narratives have become so torturous that he presents himself more as a patron saint of jazz, some sort of virtuoso half pioneer / half pretending to be practically protagonist, that the truth can hardly be trusted, as is often the case when it comes to the twisted stories of the South Delta.

As a young boy, Armstrong was brought up in extreme poverty. He had no shoes on, let alone toys to play with. However, on the same roads where he shined shoes to change, he heard the balm of life blowing around street corners from the mythical Buddy Bolden’s heavenly horn as he blew the hottest, coolest horn lines in. the stifling air of Orleans with the casual force of a lion’s purring. Of course, Armstrong wouldn’t be the only one tossed about by this Promethean wind – I guess that goes without saying, considering Bolden is nicknamed the inventor of jazz – but in Louis’ case it seems fateful that he caught the benison. of that musical breeze from the front.

In the surging stream of modern music, Armstrong would later influence and inspire millions of full-fledged musicians, including Sam Cooke. In his definitive civil rights hymn, “A Change Is Gonna Come,” Cooke launches the first line: “I was born by the river, in a small tent, and like that river, I have been running ever since. The river in question is the Mississippi, making it perhaps the most deeply varied vignettes in musical history.

Arguably the Mississippi Delta is where modern music has flowed benevolently around the world, but likewise, it was one of the most fiercely racially divided regions in modern history, setting off a current of fluid fear among the black inhabitants. Aside from those two notable brushstrokes in the melodic motif, there are a myriad of others relating to the tides of change, the unburdened flow of the soul and so on until the endless amounts of corroborations. personal data are almost dried up.

The Mississippi River was also the means by which slaves were shipped south to reach the plantations of the Delta. It was the desperate breeding ground where modern music crawled out of the mud and misery of one of mankind’s great atrocities and etched like golden poetry written into the margins of one of the pages. the darkest in history. As Nina Simone once said, “funk, gospel and blues are all out of slavery, out of depression, out of sadness.”

It is not known whether or not Cooke persuaded the many multitudes that can be gleaned from the song into existence, but what can be deduced with certainty is the beauty and importance that came from the mainstream of the rising melody and emboldened words. Music is a godsend, and the harsh streets of New Orleans have always been alive with it, after all, they basically made it up.

In short, when those who are suffering in the plantations cannot speak, they must learn to sing. This encrypted meaning and the humanized expression of the blues elucidated the vital necessity of music, both as a means of communication and as a moving vehicle towards exultation. Buried in this underlying subversive current was the monolithic strength of voodoo, a religion that drifted from West Africa and the Caribbean onto slave ships. All the blues notions of the devil at the crossroads, the hoodoo and the hexagons are deeply linked to the ways of the old world and the Caribbean.

Catholicism was imposed on slaves arriving from overseas, but rather than drowning out voodoo tunes; it just formed a merger. Drums and rhythms may have been abandoned out of necessity, but Gospel songs became a fusion where Voodoo and hymns met. The same feeling of deep exultation was present, and the drums were vocalized in the chants and incantations of the singing songs of salvation of the soul.

(Credit: Pixabay)

Nowhere was this mishmash of cultures, sounds and spirit deeper than in Congo Square. Located in the heart of what is now aptly known as Louis Armstrong Park, just north of the French Quarter, this legendary location is where African slaves gathered when they were allowed to take Sunday off. This gathering was imposed in 1817 when the mayor of the city of New Orleans specifically selected the square as the only permitted “gathering ground”.

Imagine, if you will, how such a joyous cacophony in the heart of the bustling chic of New Orleans could shatter the eruption of modern music. Jazz, blues and rock ‘n’ roll came roaring from the swirling mixing bowl of the plaza, surrounded by twisted tupelo trees, winding dust roads and the giant clay ball moon that seems to be at hand. a few miles closer to the delta than the rest of the world, presiding in the hot, sultry evening air, all looking out for the sweet sound of celebration despite the dowry circumstances.

Two things happened in this square that sowed the future of music. The first is beautifully elucidated by writer James Baldwin. He wrote: “All I know about music is that not many people really hear it. And even then, on the rare occasion that something opens inside, and music enters, what we primarily hear, or hear corroborated, are personal, private, vanishing evocations. But the man who creates the music hears something else, faces the roar that rises from the void, and imposes an order upon him when he strikes the air. What is evoked in him is therefore of another order, more terrible because he has no words, and also triumphant for the same reason. And his triumph, when he triumphs, is ours.

This sense of the vitality of music could not be underestimated. If upcoming genres like punk promoted the idea that music was more about emotion than being a master, then they were simply borrowing a roaring notion from Congo Square centuries ago. Music, if only for a brief moment on a Sunday, truly triumphed over sorely imposed trials. This remains the case with modern music to this day.

The second step was simple: you could have a blues guitarist on one bench, someone singing hymns on another, and a drummer on the next. Great swinging jams could erupt as music from all corners merged into one. This atmosphere remains present to this day. Walk down to the square any afternoon and you’ll find buskers of all kinds frequenting the historic space. This effervescent vibe is the one Bob Dylan longed for when he wanted his euphoric “evening empire” not to “vanish into dust”. The bars, clubs and street names may have changed since then, but there is an atmosphere in the city that will undoubtedly be everlasting.

Neighboring Congo Square, in the twisted old French Quarter, the eccentric world that Armstrong, Kerouac, Dylan and everyone savored remains bustling with jazz and blues galore. Snug Harbor, Lafitte’s Blacksmith Shop Bar, Erin Rose, and Elizabeth’s all offer the timeless appeal of dizzying nights with cool sweat in your hair and never a dull sight to the eyes. Likewise, daytime cafes, like Monty’s on the Square, provide a breezy and tranquil place to all enjoy tired looks, with the peace of the Garden District always awaiting a trip.

There are many subjective arguments in modern music, but New Orleans proves to be insistent that it really was born in the ethereal Congo Square.


Source link

]]>
Dallas Winds Launches Fun Program Of Mainly Modern Music, Including Frank Ticheli Premiere https://iamwarmusic.com/dallas-winds-launches-fun-program-of-mainly-modern-music-including-frank-ticheli-premiere/ Thu, 18 Nov 2021 12:01:20 +0000 https://iamwarmusic.com/dallas-winds-launches-fun-program-of-mainly-modern-music-including-frank-ticheli-premiere/ The Dallas Winds know how to put on a good show. From friendly opening remarks from Executive Director Kim Campbell and charismatic comments from conductor Jerry Junkin to the spirited playing of the ensemble, Tuesday’s concert at the Meyerson Symphony Center provided fun and suave entertainment. Other classical groups in the area could learn a […]]]>

The Dallas Winds know how to put on a good show.

From friendly opening remarks from Executive Director Kim Campbell and charismatic comments from conductor Jerry Junkin to the spirited playing of the ensemble, Tuesday’s concert at the Meyerson Symphony Center provided fun and suave entertainment.

Other classical groups in the area could learn a thing or two.

An extensive program, which will be repeated in Chicago in December, features mainly music from the 20th and 21st centuries. Traditional selections include the spirit of Richard Strauss Fanfare of the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra and the march of Sousa, The glory of the yankee navy.

Frank Ticheli, who grew up in Richardson, is a well-known composer for wind orchestra. He ran his own eight-minute celebration To hit! at its world premiere.

To hit! stirs up the excitement in passages of slamming percussions and Latin dance rhythms. Contrasting dark, dissonant energies – marked by muted trumpets, horn tuning forks, and full ensemble accents – may reflect on-going pandemic anxieties. At least on first listen, it wasn’t clear how the different episodes come together as a whole.

Combining jazz, gospel and blues in two movements over 13 minutes, the American composer Omar Thomas’ Come sunday honors black religious services. In “Testimony,” a tenor saxophone solo introduces a touching song – delivered with panache by Roy E. Allen Jr. – then played throughout. “Yell!” rollicks with quivering cymbals, hand claps and groove riffs. Members of the audience would sometimes clap and shout at the sound of the music.

Members of the Dallas Winds perform at the Morton H. Meyerson Symphony Center in Dallas on November 16.
(Lawrence Jenkins / Special Contributor)

Inspired by green energy sources, American composer Viet Cuong Renewal is a 16-minute concerto in three movements for harmony orchestra and percussion quartet. In “Hydro”, the quartet clink crystal glasses half full of water in interlocking patterns. The slow harmonies of the group deepen the meditative atmosphere.

In “Wind”, the soloists tirelessly repeat cymbal and drums strokes. They also evoke a wind turbine by hitting a snare while turning it at ever faster speeds. With the quartet playing metallic instruments, “Solar” features brilliant tones in a major key, dropping into cinematic grandeur towards the end.

The Epoch Percussion Quartet, composed of Cory Fica, Nigel Fernandez, Oni Lara and Andrew Lynge, combined rhythmic precision and non-stop energy.

American composer Steven Stucky was a Pulitzer Prize winner who died in 2016. His Aug 4, 1964, a quasi-oratorio marking the centenary of President Lyndon B. Johnson, was commissioned and premiered in 2008 by the Dallas Symphony Orchestra.

The Dallas Symphony Orchestra performed Steven Stucky's piece "August 4, 1964," during the Carnegie Hall Spring for Music series at Carnegie Hall in New York, New York on May 11, 2011.

Stucky’s Nine-Minute Brilliant on Henry Purcell Queen Mary’s funeral music is mainly a direct transcription for wind ensemble. Yet it also contains passages where Stucky blends into modernist ideas, such as clusters of tones.

Stravinsky’s 1919 Suite Bird of Fire ballet never saw the light of day in an arrangement by Dutch conductor Jacco Nefs. Junkin sometimes lengthened the beat at the end of lines, but the phrasing needed more form and direction. There was also little momentum from section to section. Among many soloists, bassoonist Laura Bennett Cameron stood out, softly singing the mysterious lullabies of the “Lullaby” with a creamy tone.

The arrangement’s thick textures buried important details, such as the prominent xylophone part in “Hellish Dance”. For such pictorial music, it would have been useful to display the names of the movements in surtitles.

The general sound of the band was often bright, sometimes shrill. The intonation was good in the brass, but the upper winds were sometimes blurry. The overall coordination was generally solid, although it started to slip later in the evening.

As a reminder, the group offered to the British composer Peter Meechan Song of hope in honor of Ryan Anthony, the former principal trumpeter of the Dallas Symphony who died last year after a long battle with multiple myeloma. (Anthony had occasionally recorded and performed with the Dallas Winds.) Trumpet soloists James Sims, Wiff Rudd and Tim Anderson seized the opportunity in a touching and heartfelt tribute.

CORRECTED at 11:55 am on November 18: This story has been updated to reflect the fact that Roy E. Allen Jr., and not Donald Fabian, was the saxophone soloist in Omar Thomas’ rendition of Come Sunday.

Dallas Symphony Orchestra Principal Trumpet Ryan Anthony performs with the orchestra at the Meyerson Symphony Center.
The vocal ensemble Gesualdo Six performs at the Church of the Incarnation in Dallas on November 14, 2021.


Source link

]]>
Compelling gibberish opens modern music festival https://iamwarmusic.com/compelling-gibberish-opens-modern-music-festival/ Tue, 16 Nov 2021 07:34:27 +0000 https://iamwarmusic.com/compelling-gibberish-opens-modern-music-festival/ Kentridge (left) in his absurd dialogue with soprano Greif, violinist Igor Semenoff and tap dancer Peter Kuit Photo credit: Philharmonie Luxembourg / Alfonso Salgueiro A man in his fifties comes on stage, sits behind a lectern and opens a book. He clears his throat and it looks like his audience is ready for a serious […]]]>

Kentridge (left) in his absurd dialogue with soprano Greif, violinist Igor Semenoff and tap dancer Peter Kuit

Photo credit: Philharmonie Luxembourg / Alfonso Salgueiro

A man in his fifties comes on stage, sits behind a lectern and opens a book. He clears his throat and it looks like his audience is ready for a serious lecture on a worthy subject. But as soon as South African multi-artist William Kentridge starts speaking, only utter nonsense comes out of his mouth – which he maintains for the next 40 minutes.

Such was the audacity of Kurt Schwitters that his Ursonate still shocks a hundred years after the German Dadaist wrote it, even if you have already heard it. The opening line – “Fümms bö wö tää zää U, pögiff, kwii Ee”- is a sign of what is about to hit you. The rest of this four parts Klanggedicht (sound poem) doesn’t compromise much more. Nothing, in fact.

Still, Kentridge is a compassionate performer, whose smooth delivery allows you to listen with interest. Sometimes he even seemed convincing. The 66-year-old can obviously count on goodwill in the Grand Duchy, after the Mudam exhibited his art this year (one of the best shows he has put on). Friday’s performance was a worthy coda.

The Ursonate was the opening night of the Rainy Days festival of contemporary classical music, which Luxembourg can consider itself happy to have. It is now the 20th time that the festival has taken place and the works on offer are of world quality. There are no less than 18 world premieres, while eight other pieces will only be performed for the second or third time.

Contemporary music is notoriously niche. Classical composers practically ceased to gain popularity after Igor Strawinsky. While abstract painting is now almost more of a cliché than figurative art, music without a clear melody, harmonic structure or rhythm demands too much from most audiences. It’s a shame, because contemporary music contains a wealth of works that are sometimes – not always, it is true – surprisingly beautiful or moving.

It’s music best enjoyed live, with the astonishing skills of musicians performing these demanding works in full screen. If you’ve never heard it before, Rainy Days is a great opportunity to pick a gigs or two and decide if you like what you hear. If the strictly classical sounds too disturbing, there is also electronic music, world music and film music, and jazz.

On Friday, for example, the Orchester philharmonique du Luxembourg will present works by three composers in their forties and fifties – a French, a German, a Belgian – one never heard, the others two or three times. On Saturdays, you can be among the very first audiences to hear works by young composers from the United States and Europe and, in the evening, a world premiere of a work by the Greek Georges Aperghis, one of the leading modern composers. .

There are also works that mix Persian with contemporary Western music, a new work for two big names in experimental rock and electronic music by Cédric Fermont, a “musical traveler” in search of experimental music in Africa and Europe. Asia. And yes – tickets are still generally available.

Back to William Kentridge. Just as he started to look like another baby boomer on a stage buzzing about something you don’t understand, a woman in the audience stood up and fiercely started yelling at him. words. It was Ariadne Greif, a New York soprano who received rave reviews in America for her roles in baroque and contemporary works.

As she took the stage to chat with Kentridge, a violinist and – why not – a tap dancer too. The last 10 minutes were a spectacle to watch and listen to. The disruption was a commentary on the spartan way Schwitters treats his audience – and provided just the touch of diversity the evening needed. As absurd to amuse, it bodes well for the festival.


The Luxembourg Times has a new LinkedIn page, follow us here! Get the Luxembourg Times delivered to your inbox twice a day. Sign up here to receive your free newsletters.


Source link

]]>